Showing posts with label Maharastrian. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Maharastrian. Show all posts

Maharashtrian Tomato Saar Recipe [Video]


Nothing says Summer like red juicy ripe tomatoes. Use the tomatoes to make this simple vegan curry from India. The Tomato Saar is vegan and gluten free.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar

Red juicy tomatoes = Summer, right?

Summer is the best and worst time to be in India. Yeah. Let's go with the bad thing first, it is worst because of the heat. If it weren't for the summer rains in Bangalore, I would probably be swimming in a pool of my own sweat. Ugly visual, scratch that. But the best past about Summer, the best fruits and vegetables. 

If you want to have the sweetest fruits, the juiciest fruits, you have to come to India in Summer and then probably hide yourself in an AC room the entire day. 

Come April, I had a good list of recipes I wanted to cook for Summer and share with you guys. As predicted, I never stuck to that list. I really never do, I don't know why I bother. Instead of making what I had so patiently planned (I even set a Google Calendar reminder, I know, that's deep), I went on cooking with what I found in the market. I think it worked out better this way. At least I have been cooking seasonal to a large extent.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar

This Tomato Saar is just that, seasonal and delicious. But then you get tomatoes all year round, so what's your excuse to not make this? I assume you have nothing, so read ahead.

The history, I first encountered this Tomato Saar when I was in College. We were working to change the hostel mess menu when someone suggested this, and the cooks (lazy as they were) actually agreed to make this. They made it for the trial menu one weekday lunch and for some reason, while I really enjoyed it, it never did make the cut to the final menu. I tend to blame the cook's stubbornness to change, that led to it being out, because it was so delicious. A term I rarely used on anything that came out of the hostel kitchen.

Ever since, I've made this many times when I want a quick curry that does not require me to boil dal or make some elaborate masala. This Tomato Saar is simple, quick, vegan, healthy, gluten free and foremost, it is tasty. It is tangy and spicy and pairs perfectly with rice or with bread. 

To make the Tomato Saar, boil tomatoes, blend them with coconut, garlic and chillies, boil this puree again and season it. That's literally it! I'm really not giving you any excuses to chicken out, am I?

So wishing you a Happy Summer! May you cook with the best of the season's produce.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar



If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Maharashtrian Tomato Saar Recipe


Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saarMaharashtrian Tomato Saar is a simple yet flavorful vegan curry made from tomatoes and coconut. The dish is made popularly in the Western state of Maharashtra in India. 

Recipe Type:  Curry
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     30 minutes
Total time:     40 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2


Ingredients:


3 large Tomatoes, diced
0.75 cup grated Coconut
2 cloves Garlic
2 Green Chilli, roughly chopped
2 Tbsp Oil
1 tsp Cumin Seeds
Curry leaves
Salt to taste
1 Tbsp Coriander leaves, chopped
Water as required

Method:


1. Boil the roughly diced tomatoes in water until soft.
2. Drain the tomatoes and allow to cool. Keep the water it was boiled in aside, do not throw away.
3. Blend together the tomatoes, coconut, garlic and green chillies along with a little water until smooth.
4. Heat oil in a kadhai and add cumin seeds.
5. Once they brown, add in the curry leaves. 
6. Add in the tomato-coconut paste. Add the water used to cook the tomatoes as required to reach the desired consistency.
7. Add salt and boil for 6-8 minutes. Remove from heat and garnish with coriander leaves.
8. Serve hot with rice or bread.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar


If you liked this, you may also like:

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav
Misal Pav

Oriya dalma with mix vegetables
Dalma
North Karnataka kaalu palya made with alsande kaalu. Black eyed peas curry.
Black Eyed Peas Curry





Read more ...

Jain Pav Bhaji [no onion, garlic, potato]


Jain Pav Bhaji has a bhaji (curry) made with raw banana or plantain. Jain Pav Bhaji is made without potatoes, onions, ginger or garlic. The bhaji is served along with buttered pav.

In a hurry? Jump to Recipe

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes

Yay! It's friday and I had an awesome evening. I logged off early for the day as I finished my work early. Which was a delight after several days of stress. I decided to take some time off for myself.

And when I want to relax and enjoy some me time, I visit food markets. Yes, nothing can excite me more than seeing the options in food and props out there. A true blue food blogger at heart. So I went to FoodHall and window shopped a lot there. Finally picked up some great looking sourdough bread and some exotic flavored cream cheese for my breakfast tomorrow. So looking forward to the morning, I can't wait for the night to fly through.

Going forward to my recipe of the day - Jain Pav Bhaji. Pav Bhaji is a popular street food that most probably originated out of Mumbai or just got super popular in Mumbai. Hence, its mostly called Mumbai Pav Bhaji. The "Bhaji" refers to a spicy curry made with mashed vegetables that is usually served with lots of butter and chopped onions and a quarter of a lime to be eaten along with a fluffy light square bread called "Pav". The bhaji is usually made of potatoes and other mixed vegetables like capsicum, carrot, onions, tomatoes etc. But this recipe is unique because it does not use any root vegetables, which are the base of a regular Mumbai Pav Bhaji.

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes

The first "dharma" or principle of Jainism, an ancient religion in India, preaches non violence. While I was aware of Jainism, marrying a Jain guy brought me closer to this way of life. I started noticing life more where I would never have. I now make sure I look down when I walk in gardens and on garden paths, just so that I don't stamp an ant or a caterpillar. But life, in Jainism is not limited to animals or insects, it also extends to vegetables and fruits. Those who follow the religion strictly refuse to eat anything that grows below the ground. Vegetables like garlic, ginger, onions, potatoes, carrots etc. Since uprooting the plant to eat the root, actually kills the plant as well as the microorganisms that thrive underground. While my new family isn't extremely strict and follows this diet only on festivals and other good occasions, there are a few friends who live their daily lives avoiding the root vegetables.

In the past when I thought of a Jain Pav Bhaji, I always thought it was Pav Bhaji that was made without onions and garlic, it never struck me that Potato is also a no-no. This time when Raj brought a lot of home grown raw Bananas from my in-law's place, I decided to do something different with them and attempt a Jain Pav Bhaji. I had never expected it to taste so similar to the regular Mumbai Pav Bhaji. I never missed the flavor of the garlic or the onions, it tasted the same as always.

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jain Pav Bhaji Recipe


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoesJain Pav Bhaji has a bhaji (curry) made with raw banana or plantain. Jain Pav Bhaji is made without potatoes, onions, ginger or garlic. The bhaji is served along with buttered pav.

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     40 minutes
Total time:     50 minutes
Yield:                Serves 3-4

Ingredients:


2 Raw Banana
3 Tomatoes
1 cup Cauliflower Florets
0.5 cup Green Peas
0.5 Capsicum
2 Tbsp Oil
2-3 tsp Pav Bhaji Masala
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
1 tsp Red Chilli Powder
1 Lime
Handful of Coriander leaves
Salt to taste
Water as required
Butter to serve (Optional)

Method:


1. Cut the raw bananas into 3 large pieces. Add 2 cups of water and pressure cook until completely cooked.
2. Drain and allow the bananas to cool.
3. Cut the cauliflower into florets and boil them along with the green peas until cooked. This can either be pressure cooked or in a open pot.
4. Drain and keep aside.
5. Once the bananas are cool, peel the bananas and roughly mash them.
6. Puree the tomatoes in a mixer/blender.
7. Heat oil in a large frying pan. You can also use a kadhai or a large tava.
8. Once the oil is hot, add in the pureed tomatoes and cook on medium heat for 3-4 minutes. Keep stirring to prevent the tomatoes from burning.
9. Add in the turmeric powder and the pav bhaji masala. Pav bhaji masala is pretty spicy, so I recommend adding it by the spoonfuls and adjust according to taste.
10. Mix well and add in the mashed bananas, boiled cauliflower, peas and finely chopped capsicum.
11. Using a potato masher, mash the vegetables. Mash as per the consistency you want. If you want a chunky bhaji, mash roughly.
12. Add a little water and continue to mash until you get the desired consitency.
13. Add salt to taste and mix well. Add in the red chilli powder if using. You can also add more pav bhaji masala at this point. Mix well.
14. Cook on low heat for 8-10 minutes. Stir occassionally.
15. If the bhaji gets too dry, add a little water. If it is too watery, cook it longer so that the water evaporates.
16. Turn of the heat and add in the lime juice to taste.
17. Garnish with the chopped coriander leaves.
18. Add a generous spoonful of butter to each plate while serving. Skip this step if making for a vegan crowd.
19. Serve with butter toasted Pav.




If you liked this, you may also like:

Raw banana plantain koftas in a coconut milk based spicy tangy gravy
Raw Banana Kofta Curry

South Indian curd based curry
Doddapatre Tambuli



Read more ...

Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe [Video]


Bele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

I confess, I have a sweet tooth. From the first drop of honey that I tasted as a baby, I’ve had that weakness for sweets.

Time has proven, that my weakness for sweets is much stronger than my will power to ignore them. So instead of fighting a losing battle, I’ve given up and let myself enjoy them. After all, there is so much chaos and bitterness everywhere, at least my stomach can be full of sweetness.

Of all the sweets I know, Holige has always been the crown jewel. You know how cakes are synonymous with weddings in the West, to a Kannadiga (people of the state of Karnataka), a holige holds the same place. When you are unmarried, a lot of the older folks in the family will inevitably ask you when you will treat them to a feast with Holige, which is nothing, but a nice way of asking you the nosy question of when will you get married. I know this from experience *rolling eyes*.

So when we were planning our wedding menu and Raj declared he hates Holige, for a fleeting moment I wondered if he was the guy for me. Here I was in love with Holige, the quintessential wedding dessert and here was my man questioning its presence it our wedding. (May be he was jealous that I’ve loved it longer, who knows?). But my mom settled it by having 2 desserts, one that he liked and one that I liked. Wise woman. And both of us were happy.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

Now, the Holige is not a very difficult dessert to make if you follow your instincts, but until recently, it was something that had to be made at home. No sweet shop ever stocked it, and even if they did, it was never as good as the homemade ones. But recently, I’ve seen a lot of holige shops spring up around the city and they make some really good ones there. You will know how fond people are of Holige by just looking at the crowd at these stores.

But we still love to make our own, because it is so easy and so delicious. A Holige is made of 2 components – the dough and the stuffing (also called hurna or puran). The dough can either be of only whole wheat flour (atta) or of only all purpose flour(maida) or a mix of the two. I’ve found that only whole wheat flour makes it slightly tougher in texture and only all purpose flour makes it chewier. The mix of flours works best for me. The stuffing is what gives flavor to the holige. Holige can be stuffed with a variety of things – lentils/dal, coconut, peanuts, and for the adventurous, there are dry fruits, dates and carrots too. While I love all varieties, this recipe is all about the lentil/dal or bele one. Chana Dal works best for Bele Holige.

To make the stuffing, chana dal is boiled, drained and pureed with very little water until smooth and then cooked with jaggery until it forms a thick paste. This is flavored with cardamom for the minimalist, while you can add other spices like dry ginger powder or fennel seeds powder etc. Getting the consistency of the stuffing right is what all the fuss is about in making the holige. Like I said before, follow your instincts, and you won’t falter. You should be able to take the stuffing in your hands (once cool) and shape it into a ball that holds its shape. If it sticks to your hands or doesn’t hold its shape, it needs to thicken further. Put it back on the heat and allow it to thicken. If the stuffing powders in your hands, add a little water or milk and make it thinner.

Once you have the right stuffing, the holige is very easy to make. Holige is traditionally pan fried with a lot of ghee, but to make it vegan, use vegetable oil. I’ve made it with oil too and it doesn’t affect the texture.

Holige tastes best when served warm, with lots of ghee or milk.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe


Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbreadBele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     45 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     90 minutes
Yield:                Makes 10 to 12 medium Holige

Ingredients:


For the Stuffing (Hurna / Puran)


1 cup Chana Dal
1.5 cups Jaggery Powder
1 tsp Cardamom Powder

For the Dough:


2 cups Wholewheat Flour
1 cup All Purpose Flour
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
0.25 tsp Salt
Water as required

Ghee or Oil to fry

Method:


To make the Stuffing:


1. Wash the chana dal twice in water and then soak and leave aside for 30 minutes.
2. Pressure cook the chana dal with 2-3 cups of water until it is cooked. It may take 4-5 whistles or 8-10 minutes after the pressure builds up. If not using a pressure cooker, cook the chana dal in a covered pan until completely cooked.
3. Drain the chana dal and allow it to cool.
4. Once cool, blend it into a smooth paste. Use as little water as possible.
5. Heat a non stick kadhai and add the chana dal paste to it. If you are not using a non stick kadhai, add a little ghee first and then add the chana dal paste.
6. Add in the jaggery powder and mix well. If you want a mildly sweet holige, add only 1 cup of the jaggery powder. You can taste the stuffing and add more if required.
7. Continue cooking the stuffing on low heat while stirring frequently until the stuffing thickens. It may take 15-20 minutes.
8. Add in the cardamom powder and mix well. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
9. If the stuffing feels thin in consistency after cooling, add it back to a kadhai and heat it again until it reaches the desired consistency.
10. While the stuffing cools, make the dough for the holige.

To make the Dough:


11. To make the dough, take the wholewheat flour and all purpose flour in a large bowl. Add in the turmeric powder and salt.
12. Knead it to a smooth dough with water. Add water as required.
13. Cover the dough and rest for 30 minutes.

To make the Holige:


14. To make the holige, take a lime sized ball of dough and roll it out into a small disc on a flour dusted surface.
15. Take a lime sized ball of stuffing and place it on the rolled out dough.
16. Seal the edges and roll out the holige as thin as possible. Dust the holige with flour as required.
17. Heat a tava and grease it with ghee or oil. Place the holige on it.
18. Spoon ghee or oil on the other side of the holige.
19. Cook the holige on medium to high heat until both the sides are cooked.
20. Remove from heat and serve with ghee or milk.






If you liked this, you may also like:

How to make shakkarpara recipe, shankarpole recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Shankarpole

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Kadle Bele Payasa
How to make shavige payasa semiyan kheer vermicelli pudding recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Shavige Payasa




Read more ...

Mumbai Masala Toast Recipe | Bombay Sandwich Recipe [Video]


Mumbai Masla Toast or Bombay Sandwich is a popular street side sandwich from Mumbai (Bombay). The sandwich is a stove top toasted sandwich that is stuffed with spiced potato mash, sliced vegetables and grated cheese. 

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe


Bombay sandwich, Bombay masala toast, Mumbai sandwich, Spiced potato sandwich

Bombay sandwich, Bombay masala toast, Mumbai sandwich, Spiced potato sandwich

7 Years!!! I can't believe that's how long I have been meeting you guys at this very space!!

On 9th February 2012, I posted by very first recipe Sweet Potato Chips, and started this journey. I was such an amateur in this space of blogging. I was horrible at taking photos, I owned a point and shoot and clicked all my photos under tube lights at home. I didn't know how to edit them or even the right angle to take photos. While I won't claim I am an expert today, I think I have grown leaps and bounds since then in my photography. I was an absolute zero in social media promotion. This is still something, I feel I'm poor at, but I hope to improve this year. Likewise, there is so much I believe I have overcome and improved, and it was you guys who made it all possible.

I love you guys for encouraging me to keep doing this, the comments and feedbacks, that I received have just kept me going. A very big Thank You!!

I struggled for a while on deciding which recipe should mark this momentous occasion. Gee suggested this one as this is one of her favorites and I liked the idea. It ticked all the check boxes - Easy (check), Delicious (check), Indulgent (check), Snacks (check), Kid friendly (check), Family favorite (check). What more could I ask for?

Bombay sandwich, Bombay masala toast, Mumbai sandwich, Spiced potato sandwich


So, today, apart from all the applause and thanks, I bring to you a very delicious street food dish - Mumbai Masala Toast, from the streets of, ehmmm..... Mumbai!! The coastal city of Mumbai (formerly Bombay) is home to some of the best street food. Vada Pav, Masala Pav, Pani Puri, Tava Pulao and so much more. And this Masala Toast or Bombay Sandwich is one of those many more street favorites. It is actually such a simple dish, but once you eat it you totally understand why thousands of people love it.

There are several variations of the dish, I am sharing one that I have eaten.

Mumbai Masala Toast is a vegetarian sandwich that is stuffed with so many flavorful things and then toasted. To build the perfect Mumbai Masala Toast, you will need:

  • Butter. Butter is your friend, your very best friend, while making this sandwich, The street food cooks, do not shy away from it, and neither should you. So be generous, street food was never meant to be healthy. 
  • After butter, embrace those potatoes. The spiced mash can be as simple as I have shared or full of spicy masalas like some folks make. Feel free to adjust the taste to your liking. 
  • Then come in all the veggies - now that's the healthy part. Tomatoes, Onions, Beets and Capsicum. Add in cucumber if you are in the mood.
  • Green chutney is added for more flavor. 
  • Then add cheese, the more cheese, the better. 
  • Once the tall sandwich is ready, it is toasted in a unique type of toaster. If you don't have that toaster, you can either grill the sandwich in a sandwich maker or you can toast it in a pan.

Serve these sandwiches while still hot, along with some piping hot adrak wali chai or ginger tea.

Happy Weekend to all you lovelies.

Bombay sandwich, Bombay masala toast, Mumbai sandwich, Spiced potato sandwich


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email


Video Recipe





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mumbai Masala Toast Recipe


Bombay sandwich, Bombay masala toast, Mumbai sandwich, Spiced potato sandwichMumbai Masala Toast or Bombay Sandwich is a popular street side sandwich from Mumbai (Bombay). The sandwich is a stove top toasted sandwich that is stuffed with spiced potato mash, sliced vegetables and grated cheese.

Recipe Type:  Snacks, Breakfast
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     15 minutes
Total time:     25 minutes
Yield:                6

Ingredients:


12 Bread slices
1.5 cups mashed boiled Potatoes
5-6 Curry leaves, finely chopped
1 Green Chilli, finely chopped
1 tsp Mustard Seeds
2 Tbsp Oil
1 tsp Turmeric Powder
2 Tbsp chopped Coriander leaves
1 tsp Chat Masala (optional)
Salt to taste
Sliced Tomatoes
Sliced Onions
Sliced Capsicum
Sliced Beetroot
0.5 cup Green Chutney
1 cup grated Cheese
Butter as required

Method:


1. Heat oil in a pan and add in the mustard seeds.
2. Once the mustard seeds splutter, add in the chopped curry leaves and green chilli.
3. Add the turmeric powder and the mashed potatoes and mix well.
4. Add salt to taste.
5. Add chat masala now, if adding. Mix well.
6. Remove from heat and add in chopped coriander leaves and keep aside.
7. Apply butter on 2 slices of bread and then spread 1 tsp of green chutney on each of them.
8. Add the spiced potato mash on one slice of bread, over the chutney.
9. Place sliced tomato, onion, capsicum and beetroot over the potato mash.
10. Add in grated cheese and place the other bread slice with the chutney side down.
11. Grease the stove top toast maker with butter. If using a pan, grease the pan.
12. Apply butter on the outside of the sandwich and place in toaster or on pan.
13. Toast until both sides are golden brown and crisp.
14. Remove from heat and cut the sandwich into half with a sharp knife.
15. Serve hot with chutney or ketchup.




If you liked this, you may also like:

Bangalore Iyengar Bakery Style bread toast topped with an onion-carrot masala
Masala Bread Toast

vegan grilled summer vegetable open sandwich
Grilled Vegetable Sandwich
Mediterranean Veg Sandwich




Read more ...

Misal Pav Recipe | How to make Misal Pav [Video]


Misal Pav Recipe. This video shows how to make popular Maharashtrian spicy vegan curry called Misal. Misal is a curry made with sprouts and coconut that is topped with Sev or Mixture and served with Pav.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Bangalore has the weirdest weather of all places I've been to. It can be bright and sunny one day and pouring cats and dogs the next. We ran through October like it was Summer, barely a hint of chill in the air and the Sun was all powered on. And then we got loads of rain, just when I was ready to get those light trousers and leather footwear out !!  Finally, since mid-November, the chill has been setting in and it feels like Winter, at least in the evenings. The days are still as hot as Summer.

When it's cold outside, I want to stay cozy inside and eat warm spicy curries while lazily watching reruns of F.R.I.E.N.D.S. And this Misal Pav totally fits the bill. It is spicy, hearty and best of all, you can top it up with awesome crunchy things.

When I think of Misal Pav, it takes me back to my college days. Thursday night dinner in hostel was Misal Pav and it was actually horrible. If one were to eat that Misal Pav, one would never ever dare to eat one again. I don't know how the cooks in the hostel mess could mess up something so simple, but they managed to put up an unappetizing dish in the name of Misal Pav. It was only when I ate Misal Pav in a Maharashtrian restaurant that I came to appreciate the flavor and texture of this spicy vegan affair.

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Misal pav is a simple yet complex dish. It is simple to cook, but the flavors are complex, the textures are complex. Misal consists of 3 main things:

  • Usal - Usal is a quick curry made from sprouts. Sprouts are boiled with turmeric, salt and a little bit of asafoetida. You can add other spices to usal when you want to have it plain, but when you are cooking usal for Misal Pav, it is best to keep it simple. Generally, moth bean sprouts or matki sprouts are used for Misal Pav, but if you don't have moth beans, just use mung beans or any other sprouts that you can.
  • Kat - The spicy coconut based curry that dominates the flavor of Misal Pav is called the Kat. Kat is made by grinding together spices, coconut, onion and tomatoes and boiling them until the flavor develops. I have used Kokum as the souring agent in the Kat, you can use tamarind pulp instead. Kokum helps in giving a darker color to the Kat, that you may miss if you use tamarind. If you have access to Misal masala powder, then you can use that instead of the whole spices I have used.
  • Sev/Mixture/Farsan - This is the fun part of Misal Pav. Misal is always topped with crunchy spicy mixture. You can use any topping of your choice - papdi, ghatia, sev, chiwda etc. The more you add, the better it tastes. Only thing to remember is to add this at the end, while serving, else your mixture will get soggy and loose its texture and flavor.
Serve Misal with toasted Pav or regular bread. And always serve it piping hot!!

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav

If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Misal Pav Recipe | How to make Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal PavMisal is a popular spicy vegan Maharashtrian curry that is served with Pav bread. Misal is made with sprouts and coconut and is topped with Sev or Mixture.

Recipe Type:  Curry
Cuisine:            Maharashtrian, Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2-3

Ingredients:


For the Usal:


2 cups Sprouts
2 Tbsp Oil
1 tsp Mustard Seeds
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
A pinch of Asafoetida (Hing)
Salt to taste
Water as required

For the Kat:


1 large Onion
1 large Tomato
0.5 cup grated Coconut
2 Tbsp Oil
1 Clove
1" Cinnamon
0.5 tsp Pepper
1-2 Bay leaves
1 tsp Coriander Powder
1 tsp Cumin Powder
1 Tbsp chopped Garlic
1 Tbsp chopped Ginger
2 tsp Red Chilli Powder
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
3-4 Kokum peels or 1 tsp Tamarind Pulp
1-2 cups Water
Salt to taste

To assemble the Misal:


1 Onion, finely chopped
1 Tomato, finely chopped
2 cups Sev or Mixture
0.5 cups Coriander leaves, finely chopped

Method:


To make the Usal:


1. Heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds.
2. After the mustard seeds splutter, add the sprouts, turmeric powder, salt, asafoetida (hing) and 1 cup water. Cover and cook until the sprouts are cooked.
3. Grind the clove, cinnamon, pepper, ginger, garlic, coriander powder and cumin powder into a coarse masala without any water.

To make the Kat:


4. Soak the kokum peels in 0.5 cup warm water and keep aside.
5. Heat oil in a pan and add the coarsely ground masala.
6. Saute the masala until fragrant, then add chopped onion.
7. Once the onions are slightly browned, add in chopped tomato and grated coconut.
8. Fry for 2-3 minutes, then grind everything to a smooth paste with a little water.
9. Pour back the masala into the pan.
10. Add in turmeric powder, red chilli powder, salt, soaked kokum peels or tamarind pulp and 1 cup water. You can remove the kokum peels after a while if the gravy has reached the sourness you desire.
11. Allow it to come to a boil and let it boil for 8-10 minutes.
12. Adjust seasoning if required. Add more water for a looser consistency. If you want a thicker consistency, boil it longer.

To assemble the Misal Pav:


13. To serve the Misal Pav, add the usal in a bowl.
14. Pour over the spicy kat.
15. Top with finely chopped onion, tomatoes and coriander leaves.
16. Top with sev or mixture and serve with toasted pav.

If you liked this, you may also like:

How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji,  alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Goan Pao Bhaji

Bombay Pav Bhaji
Tava pilaf pav bhaji mumbai street food masala rice tomato
Tawa Pulao
Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav




Read more ...

Sabudana vada | Sabakki vada | Sago Poppers


Hi folks, what's cooking this week?

How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Now that Navratri is here, what are your plans? Has that gorgeous "Ghagra-Choli" come out of the wardrobe ? Did you go for Garba or Dandiya?

I'm not sure I'll ever wear a Ghagra-Choli, but dancing the Dandiya is definitely on my bucket list and I wish to cross it off soon. 

You know what I enjoy about festivals in India? The colors. I love to see people dressed up in colorful attire. Colorful flowers in markets and adorning houses. Large "Pandals" where community or sarvajanik celebrations happen. The diyas or lanterns that are lit up outside houses. Beautiful Rangolis everywhere. It sets such a festive mood, you want to celebrate. What is it about festivals that excites you?

How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Festivals always bring good food with them. So does Navratri. A lot of people fast during Navratri where they avoid rice, wheat, meat etc. Sabudana Vada is very popular during such "upavaas" or fasting. I don't fast, I've never done so till date and considering the foodie I am, I doubt I'll ever be able to avoid food for too long. But that does not stop me from eating all the yummy snacks like Sabudana Vada. In fact, I make them very often for breakfast or tea time snacks. They disappear quicker than I can cook them. 

Sabudana Vada is a popular Mahastrian snack made by frying balls of sabudana (sago), mashed potato and crushed peanuts. While traditionally, the vadas are deep fried, I pan fry them or shallow fry them. 

How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

To make the Sabudana Vada, first the sabudana needs to be soaked for around half hour and then drain out the water and leave the sabudana in a box or a covered bowl for 1-2 hours until they fluff up. Then add in the mashed boiled potato, crushed peanuts, curry leaves, chopped green chilli, chopped coriander leaves and salt and mix. Take lemon sized balls of this mixture and flatten them gently and place on a hot greased pan. Spoon in 1 tsp of oil on them and cook until one side browns, then flip and cook until the next side browns. If you are in a hurry, or you don't mind deep fried snacks, then go ahead and deep fry them and enjoy the traditional taste of Sabudana Vada.

Sabudana Vada tastes awesome with chutney or ketchup. I don't bother with either, as no one in my family cares what comes with it, as I said it disappears quicker than it appears. 

How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

If you liked this, you may also like:

  • Sabudana Khichdi - Another popular Maharastrian fasting meal made with the exact same ingredients as this vada.
  • Sabudana Chana Vada - Sabudana Vada where Potatoes are replaced with Chhole or Chickpeas.
  • Millet Cutlets - Shallow fried cutlets made from foxtail millet and mixed vegetables.
  • Curried Brown Rice and Zucchini Fritters -  Fritters or Tikkis made with mashed Brown Rice and grated Zucchini. Spiced with Garam Masala and pan fried. 


Sabudana Vada / Sabakki Vada/ Sago Poppers

How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.comSabudana Vadas are shallow fried vadas or poppers made with Sabudana/Sago, Peanuts and mashed potatoes.

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:          Indian/ Maharashtrian
Prep Time:     2 hours
Cook time:     20 minutes
Yield:              Makes 12-15 vadas



Ingredients:


1 cup Sabudana/Sago
2 medium sized Potato
2 finely chopped Green Chilli
8-10 Curry Leaves
0.25 cup Peanuts
2 Tbsp chopped Coriander leaves
A pinch Garam Masala (Optional)
1 tsp Red Chilli Powder (Optional)
4-5 tbsp Oil
Salt to taste

Method:


Wash the sabudana and drain all the water. Let it rest covered for about 2 hours or until the sabudana have softened.
Boil the potato and peel it.
Roast the peanuts and grind into powder in the mixer.
Mash the potato, add the sabudana, curry leaves,coriander and green chilies. Mix well.
Add salt, red chili powder, garam masala, peanut powder and mix well.
Shape into balls and flatten them gently.
Heat a tava or frying pan and grease it.
Place the sabudana vada hot tava and spoon around 1-1.5 tsp of Oil per vada. You may need more or less oil depending on your liking and the tava you have used. I used a non stick tava.
Flip them when they brown on one side.
Remove from heat once both the sides are browned.
This can be served with chutney or ketchup.


How to make vegan sabudana vada sabakki vada recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Read more ...