Showing posts with label Easy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Easy. Show all posts

Maharashtrian Tomato Saar Recipe [Video]


Nothing says Summer like red juicy ripe tomatoes. Use the tomatoes to make this simple vegan curry from India. The Tomato Saar is vegan and gluten free.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar

Red juicy tomatoes = Summer, right?

Summer is the best and worst time to be in India. Yeah. Let's go with the bad thing first, it is worst because of the heat. If it weren't for the summer rains in Bangalore, I would probably be swimming in a pool of my own sweat. Ugly visual, scratch that. But the best past about Summer, the best fruits and vegetables. 

If you want to have the sweetest fruits, the juiciest fruits, you have to come to India in Summer and then probably hide yourself in an AC room the entire day. 

Come April, I had a good list of recipes I wanted to cook for Summer and share with you guys. As predicted, I never stuck to that list. I really never do, I don't know why I bother. Instead of making what I had so patiently planned (I even set a Google Calendar reminder, I know, that's deep), I went on cooking with what I found in the market. I think it worked out better this way. At least I have been cooking seasonal to a large extent.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar

This Tomato Saar is just that, seasonal and delicious. But then you get tomatoes all year round, so what's your excuse to not make this? I assume you have nothing, so read ahead.

The history, I first encountered this Tomato Saar when I was in College. We were working to change the hostel mess menu when someone suggested this, and the cooks (lazy as they were) actually agreed to make this. They made it for the trial menu one weekday lunch and for some reason, while I really enjoyed it, it never did make the cut to the final menu. I tend to blame the cook's stubbornness to change, that led to it being out, because it was so delicious. A term I rarely used on anything that came out of the hostel kitchen.

Ever since, I've made this many times when I want a quick curry that does not require me to boil dal or make some elaborate masala. This Tomato Saar is simple, quick, vegan, healthy, gluten free and foremost, it is tasty. It is tangy and spicy and pairs perfectly with rice or with bread. 

To make the Tomato Saar, boil tomatoes, blend them with coconut, garlic and chillies, boil this puree again and season it. That's literally it! I'm really not giving you any excuses to chicken out, am I?

So wishing you a Happy Summer! May you cook with the best of the season's produce.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar



If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Video Recipe





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Maharashtrian Tomato Saar Recipe


Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saarMaharashtrian Tomato Saar is a simple yet flavorful vegan curry made from tomatoes and coconut. The dish is made popularly in the Western state of Maharashtra in India. 

Recipe Type:  Curry
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     30 minutes
Total time:     40 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2


Ingredients:


3 large Tomatoes, diced
0.75 cup grated Coconut
2 cloves Garlic
2 Green Chilli, roughly chopped
2 Tbsp Oil
1 tsp Cumin Seeds
Curry leaves
Salt to taste
1 Tbsp Coriander leaves, chopped
Water as required

Method:


1. Boil the roughly diced tomatoes in water until soft.
2. Drain the tomatoes and allow to cool. Keep the water it was boiled in aside, do not throw away.
3. Blend together the tomatoes, coconut, garlic and green chillies along with a little water until smooth.
4. Heat oil in a kadhai and add cumin seeds.
5. Once they brown, add in the curry leaves. 
6. Add in the tomato-coconut paste. Add the water used to cook the tomatoes as required to reach the desired consistency.
7. Add salt and boil for 6-8 minutes. Remove from heat and garnish with coriander leaves.
8. Serve hot with rice or bread.

Vegan tomato curry from Maharashtra, Maharshtrian tomato saar


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Jain Pav Bhaji [no onion, garlic, potato]


Jain Pav Bhaji has a bhaji (curry) made with raw banana or plantain. Jain Pav Bhaji is made without potatoes, onions, ginger or garlic. The bhaji is served along with buttered pav.

In a hurry? Jump to Recipe

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes

Yay! It's friday and I had an awesome evening. I logged off early for the day as I finished my work early. Which was a delight after several days of stress. I decided to take some time off for myself.

And when I want to relax and enjoy some me time, I visit food markets. Yes, nothing can excite me more than seeing the options in food and props out there. A true blue food blogger at heart. So I went to FoodHall and window shopped a lot there. Finally picked up some great looking sourdough bread and some exotic flavored cream cheese for my breakfast tomorrow. So looking forward to the morning, I can't wait for the night to fly through.

Going forward to my recipe of the day - Jain Pav Bhaji. Pav Bhaji is a popular street food that most probably originated out of Mumbai or just got super popular in Mumbai. Hence, its mostly called Mumbai Pav Bhaji. The "Bhaji" refers to a spicy curry made with mashed vegetables that is usually served with lots of butter and chopped onions and a quarter of a lime to be eaten along with a fluffy light square bread called "Pav". The bhaji is usually made of potatoes and other mixed vegetables like capsicum, carrot, onions, tomatoes etc. But this recipe is unique because it does not use any root vegetables, which are the base of a regular Mumbai Pav Bhaji.

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes

The first "dharma" or principle of Jainism, an ancient religion in India, preaches non violence. While I was aware of Jainism, marrying a Jain guy brought me closer to this way of life. I started noticing life more where I would never have. I now make sure I look down when I walk in gardens and on garden paths, just so that I don't stamp an ant or a caterpillar. But life, in Jainism is not limited to animals or insects, it also extends to vegetables and fruits. Those who follow the religion strictly refuse to eat anything that grows below the ground. Vegetables like garlic, ginger, onions, potatoes, carrots etc. Since uprooting the plant to eat the root, actually kills the plant as well as the microorganisms that thrive underground. While my new family isn't extremely strict and follows this diet only on festivals and other good occasions, there are a few friends who live their daily lives avoiding the root vegetables.

In the past when I thought of a Jain Pav Bhaji, I always thought it was Pav Bhaji that was made without onions and garlic, it never struck me that Potato is also a no-no. This time when Raj brought a lot of home grown raw Bananas from my in-law's place, I decided to do something different with them and attempt a Jain Pav Bhaji. I had never expected it to taste so similar to the regular Mumbai Pav Bhaji. I never missed the flavor of the garlic or the onions, it tasted the same as always.

jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoes


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



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Jain Pav Bhaji Recipe


jain pav bhaji made without onion, garlic and potatoesJain Pav Bhaji has a bhaji (curry) made with raw banana or plantain. Jain Pav Bhaji is made without potatoes, onions, ginger or garlic. The bhaji is served along with buttered pav.

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     40 minutes
Total time:     50 minutes
Yield:                Serves 3-4

Ingredients:


2 Raw Banana
3 Tomatoes
1 cup Cauliflower Florets
0.5 cup Green Peas
0.5 Capsicum
2 Tbsp Oil
2-3 tsp Pav Bhaji Masala
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
1 tsp Red Chilli Powder
1 Lime
Handful of Coriander leaves
Salt to taste
Water as required
Butter to serve (Optional)

Method:


1. Cut the raw bananas into 3 large pieces. Add 2 cups of water and pressure cook until completely cooked.
2. Drain and allow the bananas to cool.
3. Cut the cauliflower into florets and boil them along with the green peas until cooked. This can either be pressure cooked or in a open pot.
4. Drain and keep aside.
5. Once the bananas are cool, peel the bananas and roughly mash them.
6. Puree the tomatoes in a mixer/blender.
7. Heat oil in a large frying pan. You can also use a kadhai or a large tava.
8. Once the oil is hot, add in the pureed tomatoes and cook on medium heat for 3-4 minutes. Keep stirring to prevent the tomatoes from burning.
9. Add in the turmeric powder and the pav bhaji masala. Pav bhaji masala is pretty spicy, so I recommend adding it by the spoonfuls and adjust according to taste.
10. Mix well and add in the mashed bananas, boiled cauliflower, peas and finely chopped capsicum.
11. Using a potato masher, mash the vegetables. Mash as per the consistency you want. If you want a chunky bhaji, mash roughly.
12. Add a little water and continue to mash until you get the desired consitency.
13. Add salt to taste and mix well. Add in the red chilli powder if using. You can also add more pav bhaji masala at this point. Mix well.
14. Cook on low heat for 8-10 minutes. Stir occassionally.
15. If the bhaji gets too dry, add a little water. If it is too watery, cook it longer so that the water evaporates.
16. Turn of the heat and add in the lime juice to taste.
17. Garnish with the chopped coriander leaves.
18. Add a generous spoonful of butter to each plate while serving. Skip this step if making for a vegan crowd.
19. Serve with butter toasted Pav.




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Aam Panna Recipe | Kairi Panna Recipe [Video]


Aam Panna or Kairi Panna is a drink made from boiled raw mangoes and jaggery. Aam Panna is popularly made in summer across India.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

raw mango drink

Aam Panna, a beverage from my school days. My best friend's mom made the best Aam Panna ever and she never forgot to share a bottle of the concentrate with me. It was she who introduced me to this tangy sweet spicy beverage made of raw mangoes that is so popular during summers.

As I write this I realize it isn't really the right time to post this. By right time, I mean right now, this instant. Because it has just rained heavily and it is so cool that all I feel the need for is a hot cup of tea. But then I had this post all ready to go with the recipe jotted down, photos edited and the video uploaded. So I decided to go ahead and post it. And anyway it may not have rained in your city and it may be the absolute perfect time for you to try this golden treat.

Aam Panna is made in several ways, as I have learnt over the years. Earlier in my blogging days, I had posted one recipe that does not require boiling of the mangoes. That recipe involves grating the raw mango and soaking it in water, allowing the flavor of the mangoes to infuse into the water. That takes a little more time and the results are markedly different. I would not rate one above the other as each has its own taste. I've also seen recipes where the raw mango is roasted on coals or a gas stove until it is charred instead of boiling the mangoes. While I have not tried this recipe, it does sound very interesting. The one I am sharing today is the most common recipe out there.

raw mango drink

To make the Aam Panna, select firm raw mangoes. The mangoes are supposed to be unripe and sour. The mangoes are boiled, either with skin or without and then the pulp is mashed in a blender along with a sugar and spices like cumin and pepper. Some folks add cardamom too, but I feel it overpowers the fragrance of the mango, so I skip it. I also replaced the sugar with powdered organic jaggery and hence the bright orange color of my Aam Panna. If you use sugar, you tend to get a more golden color. You can also add mint while blending the panna. However, I don't recommend it if you plan to store the panna for long as the mint tends to get bitter after a few days. The blended puree is a concentrate and can be stored in the fridge for the whole of Summer. When you feel like having Panna, dilute it with water until the taste feels just right and serve. You can also add muddled mint leaves or mint puree while serving. The Aam Panna can also be diluted with Soda water or sparkling water for some added zing.

A homemade panna never has a bright green color. If you want that color, you can add food coloring, but I don't recommend it.

raw mango drink



If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





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Aam Panna Recipe | Kairi Panna Recipe


raw mango drinkAam Panna or Kairi Panna is a drink made from boiled raw mangoes and jaggery. Aam Panna is popularly made in summer across India.

Recipe Type:  Beverage
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     15 minutes
Total time:     30 minutes
Yield:                Makes 18-20 glasses

Ingredients:


4 Raw Mangoes
2 cups Jaggery Powder
1 Tbsp Pepper, freshly crushed
1 Tbsp Cumin Powder
0.25 tsp Black Salt
0.25 tsp Salt
Water as required

Method:


1. Pressure cook the raw mangoes until they are cooked. You can also boil them in a pot until done.
2. Allow the mangoes to cool, then peel them.
3. Squeeze out the pulp of the raw mangoes and add to a blender.
4. Add in the jaggery powder or sugar, roasted cumin powder, pepper powder, black salt and salt.
5. Blend to a smooth paste with a little water. Adjust the quantities of jaggery, spices and salt as required.
6. Store the aam panna concentrate in a glass bottle in the fridge.
7. To serve the panna, add 3-4 Tbsp of the concentrate to a glass. Add in ice cubes (optional) and cold water. Stir and serve.
8. If the panna feels less sweet after diluting with water, then add a little jaggery powder while serving.


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Indian mocktail made with guava and spices
Guava Panna

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Kharbuja Panaka
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Rose Lassi




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Doddapatre Tambuli Recipe [Video]


Doddapatre Tambuli is a traditional summer curry made with coconut and curd from Karnataka. This curry is made with Mexican mint leaves or Ajwain Patta.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe


South Indian curd based curry

South Indian curd based curry

There has never been a better time to make Tambuli or Thambli as now. This summer heat calls for eating something that cools your insides.

Every region in India has a yogurt (curd) based curry that is popularly made in summer. Tambuli is one of those curries in Karnataka. It is very similar to Majjige Huli, but is much simpler and cooler. The main difference is Majjige Huli is boiled, while the Tambuli is not cooked, hence, usually needs to be consumed fresh.

Doddapatre
Doddapatre is known as Big Thyme or Mexican Mint in English, Ajwain Patta in Hindi and Karpooravalli in Tamil. It is a leaf that has a pungent and distinct aroma that is closest to the aroma of bishop's weed or ajwain, although unrelated. Some people equate the aroma to that of oregano or mint. This distinct aroma and taste becomes mild when the leaves are combined with yogurt and coconut to make the Doddapatre Tambuli.

My first interaction with this dish was at a Temple. On the coastal belt of Karnataka, there is a Lord Ganapati temple at Idagunji. When my grandfather frequented the place, one had to walk for miles together to reach it and it was hidden away tucked into a forest. I've seen the temple change from a small village temple to a quite popular one. When I used to visit the temple with my parents, it was still pretty small and the highway gave no indication to the tucked away temple. With no Google maps, one had to know the road before hand or had to ask the village folks for directions. It was here that they served a simple meal for lunch - Rice and Tambuli. It was and has been the only meal at a temple that I have relished.

South Indian curd based curry

Tambuli can be made with a variety of greens, but the recipe differs slightly with each green. Some are cooked longer while some are used raw. Doddapatre is mildly sauteed until it turn slightly yellow and wilts, this makes them milder in taste. The browned leaves are ground to a fine paste along with green chilli and fresh coconut. Whisked curd or buttermilk is added along with some salt. Then a tempering of cumin seeds and curry leaves, and Tambuli is ready to be served. Tamuli is not heated again, unlike most other curries. Tambuli is served with steamed rice.

P.S - This recipe has been reposted. The recipe was originally published in 2014. Images have been updated and a video has been added. The recipe remains the same.

South Indian curd based curry


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto. If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 


You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





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Doddapatre Tambuli


South Indian curd based curryDoddapatre Tambuli is a traditional summer curry from Karnataka that is made with coconut, buttermilk or curd and doddapatre leaves, also known as Mexican mint or Ajwain Patta. This cooling curry is served with rice.

Recipe Type:  Main Course
Cuisine:          Karnataka
Prep Time:     5 minutes
Cook time:     30 minutes
Yield:              2 Servings

Ingredients:


20-25 Doddapatre Leave, chopped
0.5 cup Fresh Coconut, grated
1.5 cups Curd
1 Green Chilli
1 tsp Cumin seeds
A few Curry leaves
3 tsp Oil
Salt to taste
Water as required

Method:


1. Heat 1 tsp of oil in a pan and add the chopped doddapatre leaves.
2. Saute until the leaves wilt and turn slightly yellow.
3. Remove from heat and cool slightly.
4. Fry until the doddapatre turns slightly yellow.
5. Remove from heat and allow it to cool.
6. Grind it along with coconut, green chilli and a little water to a fine paste
7. Heat oil in the pan and add the cumin seeds. Once they brown, add the curry leaves.
8. Remove the pan from heat and add the blended paste. Mix well.
9. Add in whisked curd or buttermilk. Add salt to taste.
10. Add in more water if it is very thick.
11. Serve it with hot rice


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Kharbuja Panaka | Muskmelon Sherbat


Kharbuja Panaka is a muskmelon based beverage that is traditionally served during the festival of Ram Navami in South India.

In a hurry? Jump to Recipe

muskmelon sherbar

Night Fury completes one year on Sunday, well, at least as per the Hindu calendar. Yay!!

Sunday, the 14th is Ram Navami. And Night Fury isn’t our dragon, although Raj almost drives it as if it is, instead it is our car. When we bought it, we thought hard on what we should name it. Did you know there are websites out there that suggest names for your car based on color, type etc. They weren’t much help though. But after one hard look at the front grille of the car, and we both thought it looked like “Toothless” smiling. If you are totally lost right now, then all my references to night fury, toothless and dragons is from the movie “How to train your dragon”. It is a very good animated movie, and you should watch it.

So now there are 2 reasons to celebrate the day, one of course cause it is Ram Navami, a festival, and second it is also birthday number 1.

Ram Navami has always been a festival that invokes mixed feelings in me. As children, my mom took/dragged us to her family temple near Mangalore as Ram Navami is celebrated with a lot of grandeur there. While the festivities were nice and grand, what killed me there was the heat. April to me marks the beginning of Summer and Summer and the tropics don’t really work well together. While the tropics are always warm, Summer can literally roast you. And with Mangalore being on the coast, the humidity is very high too. So I was always sweating buckets and rushing to hydrate myself.

The good thing was that any Ram Navami celebration always has cooling drinks being served. You are bound to find either Panaka or Majjige (buttermilk) being served to keep everyone hydrated. Last year I posted the recipe for a simple Panaka. Today I'm sharing another version - Kharbuja Panaka or Muskmelon Sherbat. To make the Kharbuja Panaka, muskmelon or cantaloupe is juiced and cardamom, lime juice, pepper and jaggery are added for flavor. Chill it and serve it along with some diced muskmelon.

If you are in the mood, you can also make this Bele Holige, that is traditionally made for all festivals in South India.

Happy Ram Navami!!


muskmelon sherbar


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email






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Kharbuja Panaka | Muskmelon Sherbat


muskmelon sherbarKharbuja Panaka is a muskmelon based beverage that is traditionally served during the festival of Ram Navami in South India.

Recipe Type:  Beverage
Cuisine:            South Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     0 minutes
Total time:     10 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2

Ingredients:


2 cups chopped Muskmelon
0.5 Lime
2 Green Cardamom
0.25 tsp Pepper, freshly crushed
2 cups Water
Jaggery to taste
Muskmelon pieces for garnish
Ice cubes as required

Method:


1. Blend the chopped muskmelon along with lime juice, 0.5 cup water, pepper and jaggery until smooth.
2. Start by adding 2-3 tsp of jaggery and increase as per the desired sweetness.
3. Peel the cardamom and crush the seeds into a fine powder.
4. Add the cardamom, remaining water and ice cubes to the blender and give it a quick whizz.
5. Serve it chilled. Top with muskmelon pieces before serving.




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Dalma Recipe | How to make Dalma | Oriya Dalma Recipe [Video]


Dalma is a popular mix vegetable dal based curry from the region of Odisha in India. A variety of vegetables are simmered along with dal to give a delicious curry that is usually served with steamed white rice.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Oriya dalma with mix vegetables


Caution, this is not a Summer Recipe. But I still love it and can eat it anytime. 

The curiosity all started with a restaurant in Bangalore named Dalma. I would cross it and wonder what the name means. I had no clue it actually referred to this very popular classic Odia or Oriya dish. And then we met, me and Dalma, the curry, not the restaurant. The restaurant is still a mystery, never stepped in there.

Dalma was introduced to me by my neighbor who had an Oriya cook. He was fond of cooking his traditional cuisine once in a while and I loved it the first time I ate it. Unfortunately, I never took the recipe from him, but my neighbor who watched over him at times, gave this recipe to me. I have read online that there are different recipes of Dalma, some use coconut, some use onions, some use neither. I believe each region has adapted the dish to what is available locally. The coastal belt uses coconut while the interior regions do not. 

The Odia folks love Dalma so much that it is also served as a part of Chappan Bhog in Puri's Jagannath Temple.



Oriya dalma with mix vegetables

Oriya dalma with mix vegetables

Dalma is a very simple mix vegetable curry that is also very healthy. The dal is full of veggies and barely has any oil. The only oil used is that in tempering. Dalma is a hearty and wholesome curry that is usually served with Rice or Roti. If you plan to serve it with roti, add less water to keep the curry thick. Each variation of the recipe may use different vegetables, use what you can get your hands on. Vegetables that need time to cook are added in the beginning and once they are partially cooked, the faster cooking vegetables are added. The Oriya cook used to cook the dal in the same pan and while the dal was still cooking, he added in the veggies. I just sped up the process by using already cooked dal. Some folks may also use Chana Dal instead of Toor Dal or a mix of both. 

Wishing you a warm and comforting weekend with Dalma!

Oriya dalma with mix vegetables


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





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Dalma Recipe | How to make Dalma | Oriya Dalma Recipe


Oriya dalma with mix vegetablesDalma is a popular mix vegetable dal based curry from the region of Odisha in India. A variety of vegetables are simmered along with dal to give a delicious curry that is usually served with steamed white rice.

Recipe Type:  Curry
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Serves 3-4

Ingredients:


3 cups cooked Toor Dal (Pigeon Pea Lentils)
1 Drumstick, peeled and chopped
1 Raw Banana, peeled and diced
1 big Potato, peeled and diced
10-12 Beans, diced
0.5 cup diced Pumpkin
2 Brinjals, diced
1 Tomato, roughly chopped
1 Onion, sliced
2 Tbsp Mustard Oil
1 Tbsp Panch Phoran (whole spice mix)
1 Bayleaf
1 tsp Turmeric Powder
1 tsp Red Chilli Powder
1 tsp Cumin Powder
1 Tbsp chopped Coriander Leaves
Salt to taste
2-3 cups Water
Salt to taste

Method:


1. Add cooked toor dal (lentils) to a deep pan or kadhai. Add water as required and 1 tsp turmeric powder. Mix well.
2. Add in the drumsticks, raw banana, pumpkin, potato and beans.
3. Add salt to taste. Cover and cook until the vegetables are half cooked.
4. Add in the brinjal and cover and cook until the vegetables are almost cooked.
5. Add in the chopped tomato and cook until all the vegetables are cooked.
6. Adjust seasoning if required. Remove from heat and keep aside.
7. To make the tempering, heat mustard oil in a pan and add the panch phoran spice mix.
8. Once the spices splutter, add in the bay leaf and sliced onions.
9. Fry until the onions are translucent.
10. Add in red chilli powder and the cumin powder and saute for 1 minute.
11. Add the Dalma to the tempering and simmer for 5-6 minutes.
12. Add water if required.
13. Garnish with the chopped coriander leaves.
14. Serve hot with rice or roti.

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Dahi Sandwich Recipe | Yogurt Sandwich Recipe [Video]


Dahi Sandwich or Yogurt Sandwich. An easy and healthy vegetarian sandwich that is made by stuffing bread with a delicious mix of hung curd (yogurt), finely chopped vegetables, and spices and toasting it off in a frying pan until golden and crispy. Perfect for breakfast or snacks.

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dahi sandwich yogurt sandwich hung curd sandwich

Hola! to all you fun people out there. Weekend's near and I'm already in my lazy mood. And this sandwich is perfect for the mood. Today, I bring to you a fun and Summery sandwich - The Dahi Sandwich or the Yogurt Sandwich.

Say what you may, Summer is here, at least in Bangalore. And might I say I'm not loving it. It's gotten a tad too hot for my liking. I've been sending messages up in the sky for some rain and I hope I get a reply. Until then, all I can do is enjoy some Summery food in the shade with the fan on full speed.

So, Dahi Sandwich, when I first heard of it, I was so excited. I love Dahi (yogurt). It is the only thing that prevents me from becoming a vegan. Vegan yogurt is just not for me. If you love creamy sandwiches wrapped in crispy golden bread, then this one is the ONE for you.

dahi sandwich yogurt sandwich hung curd sandwich

Dahi Sandwich is super easy to make once you have the "hung curd". I will interchangeably use the words dahi, curd and yogurt, because they all are the same. And when I say yogurt, it is always the plain one and not flavored ones. Back to the "hung curd", hung curd is just curd from which the liquid has been drained out. There are several ways you can make hung curd. The traditional method is wrapping the curd in a muslin or thin cotton cloth and tying the cloth and then hanging it somewhere (preferably over the sink) and letting the liquid drain out. I choose the easy method, which is using a huge tea strainer. I add the curd to the strainer and keep it over a deep bowl in the fridge overnight. Come morning and all you curd is strained and you have the thick creamy solids. More about this in notes.

Once you have mastered making the hung curd, you can also try to make these delicious "Dahi Kebabs" that are perfect for dinner parties where you want to show your culinary skills. I only use homemade Dahi or Yogurt, you can learn how to make your own yogurt, here. It is super easy and the results are so much better than packaged yogurt.

After you have the hung curd, add in finely chopped vegetables, very little spice and then spread it on the bread and then toast the sandwich on a pan until crisp and golden. I kept the spices light, because I wanted the sandwich to be cooling. I added Chaat Masala, you can just add Garam Masala or any spice mix you like, or just stick to plain pepper. 

These Dahi Sandwiches are kid friendly and adult friendly (very). Also, between us, these are somewhat healthy, if you overlook the white bread and the butter. But I think on weekends, we can always cheat a little. So b-bye for now.

Happy Weekend folks, see you next week.

dahi sandwich yogurt sandwich hung curd sandwich



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Video Recipe





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Dahi Sandwich Recipe


dahi sandwich yogurt sandwich hung curd sandwichInstant Mix Vegetable Uttappa is a quick savory South Indian pancake that is made from semolina and topped with finely chopped vegetables. It is popularly served as breakfast along with some fresh coconut chutney.

Recipe Type:  Snacks, Breakfast
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     15 minutes
Total time:     25 minutes
Yield:                5

Ingredients:


10 Bread Slices
0.75 cup hung Curd
2 Tbsp Tomato, finely chopped
2 Tbsp Capsicum, finely chopped
1 Green Chilli, finely chopped
2 Tbsp Coriander leaves, finely chopped
1 tsp Chaat Masala
Salt to taste
Butter as required

Method:


1. Mix together the hung curd (see Notes), tomato, capsicum, coriander leaves, green chilli, chaat masala and salt until combined.
2. Spread the curd mixture on a slice of bread and place another bread on top to make a sandwich.
3. Slice off the edges of the sandwich.
4. Grease a pan with butter and place the sandwich on the pan.
5. Cook on low to medium heat until the sandwich turns golden brown on one side.
6. Flip the sandwich and cook until the second side browns.
7. Cut diagonally and serve.

Notes:

1. Hung curd is made by straining thick dahi or curd or yogurt in a muslin cloth for a 4-5 hours. The same quantity of yogurt may give different people different quantities of hung curd as it depends on how much liquid the yogurt contains. Different brands may give different results too. Hence, for the sake of uniformity, this recipe uses the quantity of hung curd instead of quantity of curd or yogurt.

2. To make hung curd, take a muslin cloth and tie yogurt in it. Then suspend the cloth from a tap or rod for a few hours. Alternately, you can also use a fine strainer and leave the yogurt in it in the fridge overnight.


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