Showing posts with label Dessert. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dessert. Show all posts

Almond Flour Cookies Recipe | 4 Ingredient Gluten Free Almond Cookies [Video]


Gluten-Free Almond Cookies recipe with step by step video instructions. Gluten Free Almond cookies are crescent shaped eggless cookies made with almond flour, butter, and sugar. Crescent Almond Cookies are dusted with powdered sugar to make them super delicious treat!

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gluten free eggless almond flour cookies

Friday evening, a retro song, a hot cup of tea and these almond cookies (and of course Instagram!). A perfectly relaxing moment in my week.

That's exactly what I was doing until I started writing this post. It's a beautifully warm evening, not too hot not too cold, just like how Goldilocks likes it. My trusty laptop is playing melodious songs on YouTube, I have a nice cup of tea and these sugar-coated almond flour cookies, that I dunk into my tea amidst browsing Instagram for the latest trends (and also cute puppy videos). This is exactly how I found this recipe.

gluten free eggless almond flour cookies


gluten free eggless almond flour cookies


I was as usual browsing through Insta when this cookie caught my eye. Just 4 ingredients and virtually no work. Making them is as relaxing as eating them. I had to make them, especially, since I have been experimenting with going gluten-free. Off the shelf gluten-free cookies are super expensive and not that great either, I am yet to find a one I love. But this one was love at first lick. Yes, lick. Did I not mention that these cookies are rolled through powdered sugar? So yummy....

Almond flour, while extremely common in other countries, isn't yet so easily available in India. I found a lot of options at Food Hall in Bangalore. It is also available online on Amazon. But if none of those work out for you, you can make your own at home. I found this recipe on Minimalist Baker that seems simple enough - How to make Almond Flour.

gluten free eggless almond flour cookies


Once you have the almond flour, you are all set. Oh, yeah, you also need butter at room temperature. If you forgot to keep the butter out of the fridge (like me!), then the best way to use it is to grate the cold butter and use it in the recipe. So almond flour, butter, powdered sugar and vanilla, that is all you need. The original recipe that I remember skipped the vanilla, but I love the aroma of vanilla wafting through the house. Plus I like my cookies flavored with something.

Mix all ingredients in a bowl until you have a dough that you can shape. If it feels loose, add a little milk or water or more butter. Everyone loves more butter. Shape it how you like it. The recipe I followed had them crescent shaped so I stuck to it. Once the cookies are shaped and baked, you have to do the most important step - the rolling in sugar. The rolling has to happen while the cookies are still hot or warm so that the sugar sticks to the cookie. So, either cool the cookies for 5 minutes on a wire rack and roll in the powdered sugar or if you have fireproof hands, just drop them in the sugar immediately from the baking tray and toss well until all the cookies are coated.

Enjoy it with your cup of tea or coffee or milk, whichever is your sin!

gluten free eggless almond flour cookies



If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Gluten Free Almond Cookies Recipe

gluten free eggless almond flour cookies
Almond Flour Cookies are gluten-free cookies/biscuits made with just 4 ingredients - almond flour, butter, sugar, and vanilla. Easy to make almond cookies.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            International
Prep Time:     45 minutes
Cook time:     20 minutes
Total time:     65 minutes
Yield:                15-17


Ingredients:


1 cup Almond Flour
3 Tbsp unsalted Butter
0.25 cup powdered Sugar
0.5 tsp Vanilla extract
Powdered sugar for dusting

Method:


1. In a large bowl, take almond flour, 0.25 cup powdered sugar, vanilla extract and butter (at room temperature).
2. Mix well until combined.
3. Shape into crescents or any shape that suits you.
4. Bake for 15-20 minutes at 180 degree Celsius or until golden brown.
5. Cool on a wire rack.
6. While the cookies are still warm, roll the cookies in a bowl with powdered sugar to coat the cookies with it.
7. Store in an airtight box once completely cooled.



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Beetroot Halwa Recipe | Chukandar ka Halwa | How to make Beetroot halwa [Video]


Beetroot Halwa recipe with video instructions and step by step photos. Beetroot halwa is a rich Indian dessert made by slowly cooking grated beetroots in milk and sugar. It is flavored with cardamom and topped with a lot of dry fruits and nuts. Beetroot halwa is a gluten-free dessert.

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chukandar halwa, beetroot halwa with video recipe, beetroot dessert

Hello guys! Hiya! How have you been?

I'm still trying to catch up with the seasons. So bear with me. I had this recipe all planned for the cold winters when beets are at their best. But I barely got the time to get working on it. But, yeah, I made this Beetroot Halwa many times over the winter for special occasions and no occasions at all. And each time it was devoured so quickly that I was left staring at a pink-colored bowl to wash.

I cannot recollect where I first ate beetroot halwa, but just that it was in the dessert section of a buffet lunch. And it was love at first taste. I loved the color, that magenta, what's not to love. The richness just flowed through the entire halwa. And it wasn't too sweet. I cringe at sugary-sweet desserts, but this was mildly sweet and perfect. I knew I had found a new favorite dessert.

So around new years, I declared that I would get the dessert for our small get together at my sister's place. When I disclosed I would get Beetroot Halwa, I got so much resistance, that I ended up taking two desserts, just to be safe. And guess what, the one that got over was this Beetroot Halwa.

So this is a guaranteed dish that can convert haters to lovers. Certified by my family! If you remember, I've already spoken of Raj's dislike of cooked beetroots, but this Halwa, has him converted, at least when it comes to eating beetroots as a sweet.

chukandar halwa, beetroot halwa with video recipe, beetroot dessert


Beetroots are generally very earthy in taste and that carries itself into this Halwa but very delicately. The earthiness does not overpower but makes its presence felt gently. I simply loved that. The vegetable does not lose its best property just because it is cooked differently. It makes it stand apart from the halwas.

The best part of this halwa is that it requires very little sugar. Beetroots are generally pretty sweet by themselves, plus the milk cooking down releases its own sweetness. I was surprised that I needed only half a cup of sugar for 2 cups of beetroots.

The richness of the beetroot halwa comes from 3 ingredients - ghee, milk, and khova. Frying the beetroots in ghee make the halwa fragrant and also milds down that earthiness. The beetroots are slow-cooked in milk until they are soft. Khova is milk solids. Milk is slow-cooked until all the water evaporates and we are left with milk solids. Adding khova to any dessert makes gives it that rich taste and this halwa is no different.

Be generous and top the halwa with as many nuts as you want. I added almonds, cashews, and pistachios.

Like most halwas, Beetroot halwa can be served straight-from-the-kadhai hot, or at room temperature, or chilled. 


chukandar halwa, beetroot halwa with video recipe, beetroot dessert

If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Beetroot Halwa Recipe | How to make beet root halwa


chukandar halwa, beetroot halwa with video recipe, beetroot dessertBeetroot Halwa is a rich Indian dessert made by cooking grated beet roots in milk and sugar. It is flavored with cardamom and topped with a lot of dry fruits and nuts.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2-3



Ingredients:


2 cups grated Beetroots, tightly packed
2 cups Milk
0.5 cup Sugar
2 Tbsp Ghee
2 Tbsp Khova
1 tsp Cardamom Powder
3-4 Tbsp chopped Nuts (almonds, pista, cashew nuts)

Method:


1. Wash and peel the beetroots and grate them until you have 2 tightly packed cups of beetroot.
2. Heat ghee in a kadhai and add the grated beetroots. Saute on low heat for 8-10 minutes until the raw smell of the beetroots is replaced by the fragrance of ghee.
3. Add in the milk and mix well. The milk should cover the beetroots. Cook on low heat until all the milk is absorbed. Stir occasionally if using a nonstick kadhai and scrape the milk solids from the side. If using a regular kadhai, stir frequently.
4. Add the khova and mix well.
5. Add the sugar and mix well. Cook on low heat until the sugar is absorbed. Stir occasionally.
6. Add the cardamom powder and mix until combined.
7. Top with chopped nuts.
8. Serve immediately or allow to cool. Beetroot halwa can be served hot or cold.









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kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge
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Kaju Katli Recipe | How to make Kaju Katli | Vegan Cashew Fudge Recipe [Video]


Kaju katli or kaju barfi is a diamond shaped soft fudge made from cashew nuts. It is a popular Indian sweet. Perfect to gift family and friends.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge

Deepavali is here!!

Deepavali or Diwali always brings with it the air of festivity. Deepas or lamps everywhere, akash kandils in the balconies, colorful rangolis near the threshold, brand new clothes and delicious sweets and savories. With such fervor in the air, it is hard not to celebrate.

The best part of Diwali for me has always been the sweets and savories. People painstakingly spend hours making an array of snacks to fill up boxes and on the day of diwali these are distributed between friends and family. While I always saw my mom do this when we were kids, I had never done so, until last year.

Last year for deepavali, I went to my childhood home and did just that. I made crispy Chakli and this delicious Kaju Katli. Kaju Katli is a sweet that everyone loves. It is generally mildly sweet and has a delicate flavor of cashew nuts. Kaju Katli is gluten free and can be vegan too. The version I make is always vegan, but some recipes I know call for the addition of milk or milk powder.

While the recipe looks simple, it really isn't. So don't fret if it doesn't work out for you the very first time you try. The first time I made it, the sugar syrup was not the right consistency and we ended up eating kaju halwa for a few days. That was delicious too.

kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge

What is Kaju Katli


Kaju Katli is cashew nut fudge, in simple words. It is a very popular Indian sweet that is sold worldwide and it can made from just three ingredients - Cashew nuts, Sugar and water. Some recipes call for milk, milk powder or condensed milk, but if you want a vegan recipe, you are in the right place.

Kaju Katli is a sweet that is commonly distributed for all celebrations from birthdays to promotions to festivals. Also, since it is a dry sweet that has a greater shelf life than most milk based sweets, it also makes for a good gifting option.

Kaju Barfi is a sweet similar to Kaju Katli but is made slightly differently and uses milk and milk solids. The names are used synonymously several times, so don't get confused. Kaju katli is usually thin - somewhere about 3-5mm in thickness while a kaju barfi is thicker.

kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge


Tips for making the best Kaju Katlis:


Some important notes and learnings from my mistakes, just to help you a little:

  1. Use everything at room temperature. Refrigerated cashew nuts will mess up the recipe, so keep them out overnight if you store cashew nuts in the fridge. 
  2. Pulse the grinder to powder the cashew nuts. Grinding them for too long will lead to cashew nuts leaving their oil and making them unusable.
  3. Sieve if you want to, or just skip it. Small bits of cashews just give the kaju katli a rustic feel and they are really not very noticeable in the end product.
  4. If you have some large chunks of cashew nuts that just won't grind fine enough, add as little water as possible and blend them to a puree.
  5. You need the sugar syrup at the right consistency. Use the water bowl trick mentioned in the video and the recipe to check for the right consistency.
  6. If the sugar syrup has gone beyond the required consistency and the dough looks brittle and forms hard lumps after removing from heat, allow it to cool a little, and then pulse it in the mixer until all lumps are broken and you get a fine powder. Knead this powder along with milk or water to get a smooth dough.
  7. You have to knead the dough while it is still hot. Use gloves if required.
  8. Do not knead the dough too much, it will release its oil and while it is still edible, the kaju katli will not have the same mouthfeel as the store bought ones.

kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge

If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Kaju Barfi Recipe | How to make Kaju Katli

kaju barfi recipe, Indian cashew fudge

Kaju katli or kaju barfi is a diamond shaped soft fudge made from cashew nuts. It is a popular Indian sweet. It can be made vegan.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     55 minutes
Yield:                12-15

Ingredients:


1 cup Cashew nuts
0.5 cup Sugar
0.25 cup Water
Oil or Ghee for greasing

Method:


1. Powder the cashew nuts until fine. Use cashew nuts at room temperature, cashew nuts used directly from the fridge will not give you a fine powder.
2. If the cashews are not finely powdered, you can use a sieve and remove the big unground pieces. Use a medium sized sieve. Sieve and keep aside.
3. To make the sugar syrup, in a pan (preferably nonstick), add the sugar and water and cook on medium heat. The sugar syrup needs to reach one string consistency.
4. To check if the consistency of the sugar syrup, add a small drop of the syrup into a bowl of water. If the syrup dissolves in the water, then the syrup needs more cooking. If the syrup doesn't dissolve but forms a flexible string, then it is ready.
5. Add in the ground cashew nuts and mix until combined.
6. Continue to cook on low heat until the cashew dough becomes one mass.
7. Remove from heat and move the dough to a large plate. Allow it to cool for 2-3 minutes.
8. While the cashew dough is still hot, gently knead it for 2-3 minutes until it is smooth. Do not over-knead, else the cashew will leave its oil.
9. Grease the back of a plate and place the dough on it. Roll it out until the dough is around 5mm thick.
10. Cut the kaju katli into diamond shaped pieces. Allow to cool completely.
11. Using a butter knife, gently remove the kaju katli from the plate and store it in a cool place.
12. Serve Kaju Katli at room temperature.



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Patoli Recipe | Sihi Kadabu Recipe | Goan Patoleo Recipe [Video]


Patoleo or Patoli is a traditional Konkani sweet made for Nag Panchami or Ganesh Chaturthi. Patholi are jaggery-coconut stuffed rice rolls that are steamed in fresh Turmeric leaves. This dessert is also made in Udupi-Mangalore as Sihi Kadabu.

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Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe

Patoli or Patoleo or Sihi Kadabu, a sweet with many names and just as many different recipes. Last year when I saw fresh turmeric leaves in the market, I felt the desire to make this sweet. After all, Gee loves it and so does Raj. Me? Not as much a fan of it. but I will still eat it because it is sweet and my sweet tooth can rarely pass an opportunity to be indulged. 

And then began the quest to find the perfect recipe - my mom's recipe. It is times like this that I feel the huge gap my mom's absence has left me with. She never wrote down her recipes or even remembered it enough to tell us. She believed we need to watch and learn when she cooked something. And most often, we did not, because I think we believed she will always be around to help us out when we needed it. So there I was with these fresh seasonal leaves and no recipe.

Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe


The first thing I did was look up recipes online, only to find so many variations, that I ended up confused. Next, I messaged by Goan friends, hoping to find some commonality there. Alas, there too each one had their own version. I called up my aunt to get her recipe, wishing she had my mother's recipe, but it wasn't it. I could make any one of the 100 recipes that I find online, but just 1 will taste close to what she made it. And I was on the lookout for that recipe. I'm not sure this is exactly the one, but it sure came close. I had photos from the last time she made them for us and I just found them the other day, so when I saw those turmeric leaves again in the market, it was go time. 

It is a simple recipe I'm sharing today, 7 ingredients including the fresh turmeric leaves. And that sounds just like amma. She never over-complicated her cooking. It was the simplest one with the least ingredients but tasted delicious, I guess it was the magic in her hands. Last year, I cooked the filling, this year the pics showed me, my mom, just mixed it and there was no cooking involved. Last year I soaked raw rice, then ground it to make the dough, this year I just used rice flour, as one of the pics seem like that's what she did. This is the only step I don't have photos of. The rest is similar to all the recipes. And guess what, this year, the patoli came damn close to the real deal. And we've all wolfed down so many, that we've lost count. I only hope I've done justice to her recipe.


Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Patoli Recipe | Goan Patoleo Recipe | Sihi Kadabu Recipe


Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo RecipePatoleo or Patoli is a traditional Konkani sweet made for Nag Panchami or Ganesh Chaturthi. Patholi are jaggery-coconut stuffed rice rolls that are steamed in fresh Turmeric leaves. This dessert is also made in Udupi-Mangalore as Sihi Kadabu.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Makes 3 Patoleos


Ingredients:


1 cup grated fresh Coconut
1 cup Jaggery Powder or grated Jaggery
1 tsp Cardamom Powder
1 cup Rice Flour
Pinch of Salt
Hot water as required
3 fresh Turmeric leaves

Method:


1. Mix the grated coconut, jaggery (as per taste) and cardamom powder until completely combined. Adjust the jaggery as per the desired sweetness.
2. Take rice flour in a large plate or bowl, add in a pinch of salt and knead into a smooth dough with hot water.
3. Turn on the steamer.
4. Check if the turmeric leaf fits horizontally in the steamer, if not, you can cut it into half.
5. Wash the turmeric leaves.
6. If using the whole leaf, divide the dough into 3 parts. If you have cut the leaf, divide the dough into 6 parts.
7. Wet your hands and take 1 part of the dough and gently spread it onto the smooth side of the turmeric leaf.
8. Spread the dough as thin as possible. Ensure there are no holes. You can use more dough if required. If there is excess dough, wipe it off.
9. Once the whole leaf is covered with the dough, spoon in the filling. Do not overstuff, else the stuffing will ooze out while cooking.
10. Fold the leaf lengthwise and seal the edges by pinching them.
11. Place the patoleos in the steamer and steam for 15-20 minutes. The colour of the leaf will change once it is done.
12. Remove from heat and gently peel the turmeric leaf.
13. Serve the patoleos warm.




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Paan Kulfi Recipe | How to make Meetha Paan Kulfi [Video]



Paan Kulfi is a frozen milk based dessert that is flavored with gulkand (rose jam) and paan (betel leaves). This kulfi is of Meetha Paan flavor. Kulfi is a traditional Indian ice-cream made from sweetened reduced milk. 

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Meetha paan kulfi


I could not be more excited to share this kulfi with you, it is everything I wanted it to be, and it was actually better. This Paan Kulfi is the perfect marriage of two of my favorite things, meetha paan and kulfi and I just couldn't have enough of it.

Kulfi is India's contribution to the world of Ice Cream. Kulfi is denser and creamier than the commonly available ice cream. A Kulfi is made by slowly reducing the milk until it is thick, creamy and caramelized. The reduced milk, is also called Rabdi or Basundi. As the milk caramelizes, it also brings out the natural sweetness of the milk, hence, you don't need much sugar to flavor the milk.   The dessert is also amazingly delicious at this stage and I could have bowls of it if there was enough. Flavoring is then, added and then this creamy deliciousness is frozen until it is completely set.

The flavoring for my kulfi was Meetha Paan (sweet betel leaf). This is the favorite flavor in the city right now. If your restaurant is a hip and happening place, you are definitely serving something Paan flavored. I've seen Paan Kulfi, instant Paan Ice Cream made using liquid nitrogen and Paan shots.

A traditional Paan is a betel leaf smeared with limestone and then stuffed with tobacco and betel nuts. This is consumed as a digestive after a heavy meal in several parts of India and South East Asia. As this is detrimental to one's health, the meetha Paan or Sweet Paan was born. The sweet paan is made by stuffing the betel leaf with pieces of dates, fennel seeds, dry coconut (sometimes) and a sweet rose jam called gulkand. This is super delicious. While I say this, I've realized this can be an acquired taste for few.

Meetha paan kulfi


To make this Paan Kulfi, I used fresh betel leaves that I pureed and added. The betel leaf has a strong pungent taste if consumed by itself but when mixed in the dessert the flavor becomes really mild. I started off with puree of 5 leaves and then went on to add the puree of 7 more leaves, 12 in total to get a prominent taste of paan. Also, instead of gulkand, I added a Kolkata Meetha Paan Mukhwas. This is easily available online as well as in fairs and Malls in bigger cities.  If you don't have access to either of these, but have access to a ready made meetha paan from the corner shop, just grind them fine and use them.

Paan Kulfi available in restaurants has a distinct green color. This is achieved by adding a few drops of food coloring. I'm not in favour of food coloring, so I left the kulfi to its natural color.

To make the Kulfi, always use milk with a high fat content. Some folks add cornflour, milk powder or khova to hasten the thickening of the milk. I have used the traditional method of slow cooking instead. While this takes a little more time, the kulfi ends up tasting very good. You can literally keep the milk on the lowest heat possible and continue to do your work, just peeking in every once in a while to ensure it is overflowing or burning and to scrape the sides. To cook the kulfi sooner, you can also divide the milk into 2 or more pots and reduce them individually before mixing them all together and adding sugar.

I hope you love this Paan Kulfi as much as my family and I. Wishing you a very happy Summer!

Meetha paan kulfi


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Paan Kulfi Recipe | How to make Meetha Paan Kulfi


Meetha paan kulfiPaan Kulfi is a frozen milk based dessert that is flavored with gulkand (rose jam) and paan (betel leaves). This kulfi is of Meetha Paan flavor. Kulfi is a traditional Indian ice-cream made from sweetened reduced milk.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     9 Hours
Cook time:     2 Hours
Total time:     11 Hours
Yield:                Makes 8 Kulfis

Ingredients:


2 litres Full Fat Milk
0.5 cup Sugar
10-12 Betel Leaves
2-3 Tbsp Meetha Paan Mukhwas or Gulkand
1 Tbsp Almonds, chopped
1 Tbsp Cashewnuts, chopped
1 Tbsp Pistachios, chopped

Method:


1. Boil the 2 litres of milk until it comes to a rolling boil.
2. Reduce the heat to low and continue to boil.
3. Keep stirring to prevent the milk from burning.
4. Keep scraping the solidified milk from the sides of the pot and add it to the boiling milk.
5. Once the milk has reduced to half, add the sugar. Half a cup of sugar makes the kulfis pretty sweet. Add by the spoonfuls to get the right amount of sweetness.
6. Once the milk has reduced to 1/3rd the quantity and has become thick and creamy, remove from heat and allow to cool down to room temperature.
7. Puree the betel leaves (paan) with a little milk until smooth. Use 4-6 paans for a milder taste and 10-12 paans for a stronger taste.
8. After the milk has cooled, add in the chopped nuts, meetha paan mukhwas or gulkand and the paan puree. Mix well.
9. Fill into the kulfi moulds and freeze for around 2-3 hours.
10. The kulfis should be 50% set in 2-3 hours. Remove from the freezer and gently place the ice-cream stick. This step can be skipped if you are not planning to add the ice-cream stick.
11. Place the moulds back in the freezer and freeze for 8-10 hours or until completely set.
12. To demould the kulfi while serving, dip the kulfi mould in warm water, the kulfi should loosen. If using an ice-cream stick, twist the kulfi and pull it out gently. If not then place the mould on a plate and tap the mould until the kulfi comes out.
13. Serve immediately.

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Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe [Video]


Bele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

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Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

I confess, I have a sweet tooth. From the first drop of honey that I tasted as a baby, I’ve had that weakness for sweets.

Time has proven, that my weakness for sweets is much stronger than my will power to ignore them. So instead of fighting a losing battle, I’ve given up and let myself enjoy them. After all, there is so much chaos and bitterness everywhere, at least my stomach can be full of sweetness.

Of all the sweets I know, Holige has always been the crown jewel. You know how cakes are synonymous with weddings in the West, to a Kannadiga (people of the state of Karnataka), a holige holds the same place. When you are unmarried, a lot of the older folks in the family will inevitably ask you when you will treat them to a feast with Holige, which is nothing, but a nice way of asking you the nosy question of when will you get married. I know this from experience *rolling eyes*.

So when we were planning our wedding menu and Raj declared he hates Holige, for a fleeting moment I wondered if he was the guy for me. Here I was in love with Holige, the quintessential wedding dessert and here was my man questioning its presence it our wedding. (May be he was jealous that I’ve loved it longer, who knows?). But my mom settled it by having 2 desserts, one that he liked and one that I liked. Wise woman. And both of us were happy.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

Now, the Holige is not a very difficult dessert to make if you follow your instincts, but until recently, it was something that had to be made at home. No sweet shop ever stocked it, and even if they did, it was never as good as the homemade ones. But recently, I’ve seen a lot of holige shops spring up around the city and they make some really good ones there. You will know how fond people are of Holige by just looking at the crowd at these stores.

But we still love to make our own, because it is so easy and so delicious. A Holige is made of 2 components – the dough and the stuffing (also called hurna or puran). The dough can either be of only whole wheat flour (atta) or of only all purpose flour(maida) or a mix of the two. I’ve found that only whole wheat flour makes it slightly tougher in texture and only all purpose flour makes it chewier. The mix of flours works best for me. The stuffing is what gives flavor to the holige. Holige can be stuffed with a variety of things – lentils/dal, coconut, peanuts, and for the adventurous, there are dry fruits, dates and carrots too. While I love all varieties, this recipe is all about the lentil/dal or bele one. Chana Dal works best for Bele Holige.

To make the stuffing, chana dal is boiled, drained and pureed with very little water until smooth and then cooked with jaggery until it forms a thick paste. This is flavored with cardamom for the minimalist, while you can add other spices like dry ginger powder or fennel seeds powder etc. Getting the consistency of the stuffing right is what all the fuss is about in making the holige. Like I said before, follow your instincts, and you won’t falter. You should be able to take the stuffing in your hands (once cool) and shape it into a ball that holds its shape. If it sticks to your hands or doesn’t hold its shape, it needs to thicken further. Put it back on the heat and allow it to thicken. If the stuffing powders in your hands, add a little water or milk and make it thinner.

Once you have the right stuffing, the holige is very easy to make. Holige is traditionally pan fried with a lot of ghee, but to make it vegan, use vegetable oil. I’ve made it with oil too and it doesn’t affect the texture.

Holige tastes best when served warm, with lots of ghee or milk.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread


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Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe


Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbreadBele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     45 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     90 minutes
Yield:                Makes 10 to 12 medium Holige

Ingredients:


For the Stuffing (Hurna / Puran)


1 cup Chana Dal
1.5 cups Jaggery Powder
1 tsp Cardamom Powder

For the Dough:


2 cups Wholewheat Flour
1 cup All Purpose Flour
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
0.25 tsp Salt
Water as required

Ghee or Oil to fry

Method:


To make the Stuffing:


1. Wash the chana dal twice in water and then soak and leave aside for 30 minutes.
2. Pressure cook the chana dal with 2-3 cups of water until it is cooked. It may take 4-5 whistles or 8-10 minutes after the pressure builds up. If not using a pressure cooker, cook the chana dal in a covered pan until completely cooked.
3. Drain the chana dal and allow it to cool.
4. Once cool, blend it into a smooth paste. Use as little water as possible.
5. Heat a non stick kadhai and add the chana dal paste to it. If you are not using a non stick kadhai, add a little ghee first and then add the chana dal paste.
6. Add in the jaggery powder and mix well. If you want a mildly sweet holige, add only 1 cup of the jaggery powder. You can taste the stuffing and add more if required.
7. Continue cooking the stuffing on low heat while stirring frequently until the stuffing thickens. It may take 15-20 minutes.
8. Add in the cardamom powder and mix well. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
9. If the stuffing feels thin in consistency after cooling, add it back to a kadhai and heat it again until it reaches the desired consistency.
10. While the stuffing cools, make the dough for the holige.

To make the Dough:


11. To make the dough, take the wholewheat flour and all purpose flour in a large bowl. Add in the turmeric powder and salt.
12. Knead it to a smooth dough with water. Add water as required.
13. Cover the dough and rest for 30 minutes.

To make the Holige:


14. To make the holige, take a lime sized ball of dough and roll it out into a small disc on a flour dusted surface.
15. Take a lime sized ball of stuffing and place it on the rolled out dough.
16. Seal the edges and roll out the holige as thin as possible. Dust the holige with flour as required.
17. Heat a tava and grease it with ghee or oil. Place the holige on it.
18. Spoon ghee or oil on the other side of the holige.
19. Cook the holige on medium to high heat until both the sides are cooked.
20. Remove from heat and serve with ghee or milk.






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