Showing posts with label Goan. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Goan. Show all posts

Patoli Recipe | Sihi Kadabu Recipe | Goan Patoleo Recipe [Video]


Patoleo or Patoli is a traditional Konkani sweet made for Nag Panchami or Ganesh Chaturthi. Patholi are jaggery-coconut stuffed rice rolls that are steamed in fresh Turmeric leaves. This dessert is also made in Udupi-Mangalore as Sihi Kadabu.

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Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe

Patoli or Patoleo or Sihi Kadabu, a sweet with many names and just as many different recipes. Last year when I saw fresh turmeric leaves in the market, I felt the desire to make this sweet. After all, Gee loves it and so does Raj. Me? Not as much a fan of it. but I will still eat it because it is sweet and my sweet tooth can rarely pass an opportunity to be indulged. 

And then began the quest to find the perfect recipe - my mom's recipe. It is times like this that I feel the huge gap my mom's absence has left me with. She never wrote down her recipes or even remembered it enough to tell us. She believed we need to watch and learn when she cooked something. And most often, we did not, because I think we believed she will always be around to help us out when we needed it. So there I was with these fresh seasonal leaves and no recipe.

Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe


The first thing I did was look up recipes online, only to find so many variations, that I ended up confused. Next, I messaged by Goan friends, hoping to find some commonality there. Alas, there too each one had their own version. I called up my aunt to get her recipe, wishing she had my mother's recipe, but it wasn't it. I could make any one of the 100 recipes that I find online, but just 1 will taste close to what she made it. And I was on the lookout for that recipe. I'm not sure this is exactly the one, but it sure came close. I had photos from the last time she made them for us and I just found them the other day, so when I saw those turmeric leaves again in the market, it was go time. 

It is a simple recipe I'm sharing today, 7 ingredients including the fresh turmeric leaves. And that sounds just like amma. She never over-complicated her cooking. It was the simplest one with the least ingredients but tasted delicious, I guess it was the magic in her hands. Last year, I cooked the filling, this year the pics showed me, my mom, just mixed it and there was no cooking involved. Last year I soaked raw rice, then ground it to make the dough, this year I just used rice flour, as one of the pics seem like that's what she did. This is the only step I don't have photos of. The rest is similar to all the recipes. And guess what, this year, the patoli came damn close to the real deal. And we've all wolfed down so many, that we've lost count. I only hope I've done justice to her recipe.


Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo Recipe


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are up to.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Video Recipe





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Patoli Recipe | Goan Patoleo Recipe | Sihi Kadabu Recipe


Patoli Recipe, Sihi Kadabu Recipe, Goan Patoleo RecipePatoleo or Patoli is a traditional Konkani sweet made for Nag Panchami or Ganesh Chaturthi. Patholi are jaggery-coconut stuffed rice rolls that are steamed in fresh Turmeric leaves. This dessert is also made in Udupi-Mangalore as Sihi Kadabu.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Makes 3 Patoleos


Ingredients:


1 cup grated fresh Coconut
1 cup Jaggery Powder or grated Jaggery
1 tsp Cardamom Powder
1 cup Rice Flour
Pinch of Salt
Hot water as required
3 fresh Turmeric leaves

Method:


1. Mix the grated coconut, jaggery (as per taste) and cardamom powder until completely combined. Adjust the jaggery as per the desired sweetness.
2. Take rice flour in a large plate or bowl, add in a pinch of salt and knead into a smooth dough with hot water.
3. Turn on the steamer.
4. Check if the turmeric leaf fits horizontally in the steamer, if not, you can cut it into half.
5. Wash the turmeric leaves.
6. If using the whole leaf, divide the dough into 3 parts. If you have cut the leaf, divide the dough into 6 parts.
7. Wet your hands and take 1 part of the dough and gently spread it onto the smooth side of the turmeric leaf.
8. Spread the dough as thin as possible. Ensure there are no holes. You can use more dough if required. If there is excess dough, wipe it off.
9. Once the whole leaf is covered with the dough, spoon in the filling. Do not overstuff, else the stuffing will ooze out while cooking.
10. Fold the leaf lengthwise and seal the edges by pinching them.
11. Place the patoleos in the steamer and steam for 15-20 minutes. The colour of the leaf will change once it is done.
12. Remove from heat and gently peel the turmeric leaf.
13. Serve the patoleos warm.




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Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread
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Sweet & Sour Mango Curry | Saasav | Pashingiri Recipe [Video]


Pashingiri or Saasav is traditional sweet and sour Mango Curry from the Konkan coast of India made by simmering ripe baby mangoes in a vegan masala made of coconut and spices. This curry is popular in the coastal households during Summer.


In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe


sweet and sour mango curry, Mangalore pashingiri curry, Goan mango saasav, Konkani saasav

Summer is almost over and the love of my summers is going to go out from markets soon. Until then we are going to honour the king of fruits - Mango. For us, in the tropics, summer isn't all about the Sun, we see the Sun all year round. But summer brings with it the delicious juicy selection of seasonal fruits like the mango, jackfruit, guavas and melons. But it has always been the mango that rules my heart.

If you love Mangoes as much as I do, you may enjoy these other mango recipes:

MAVINKAYI CHITRANNA / RAW MANGO RICE
AAM PANNA
INSTANT MANGO PICKLE
RAW MANGO GOJJU
HAGALKAI MAVINKAYI GOJJU
MANGO CHEESECAKE
FRUIT TART WITH MANGO CREAM
AAMRAS / MAVINKAYI SEEKARNE

sweet and sour mango curry, Mangalore pashingiri curry, Goan mango saasav, Konkani saasav

sweet and sour mango curry, Mangalore pashingiri curry, Goan mango saasav, Konkani saasav


Lalbagh in Bangalore has been hosting the annual Mango Mela or Mango Festival for years. Every year farmers from around Bangalore set up their stalls to sell naturally ripened mangoes and organic mangoes. In 2019, it started from 1st June and it is scheduled to be around for 3 weeks. So if you are in the city, do not miss it. They have a wide variety at very competitive prices. We went there on Saturday ago and bought several kilograms of Alphonso, and some of these tiny Sugar Baby or Sakre Gutti. 

I bought the Sugar Baby mangoes only to make this sweet and sour ripe mango curry. You heard it right, ripe mango not raw. The first time I made it I called up several people and collected 5 different recipes, before I decided to make this one given to me by my very close friend from Goa. The Goan version uses Turmeric and Asafoetida, which is optional in the Mangalore version.

There are 2 major variants of this curry - cooked and uncooked. The recipe listed here is the cooked one. The other one, where the coconut masala is not cooked, resembles this Tambuli recipe.

This Mango Curry is best served with rice, but can also be served with bread on the side.

Enjoy the mango season while it lasts!

P.S - This is a repost of a 2015 post. Video instructions are added and the post is altered slightly, but the recipe remains the same.

sweet and sour mango curry, Mangalore pashingiri curry, Goan mango saasav, Konkani saasav


Video Recipe





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Sweet and Sour Mango Curry | Saasav | Pashingiri

Sweet and Sour Mango curry made with ripe mangoes and fresh coconut. This recipe is famous along the Konkan coast (Western coast of India) and is a popular curry in Summers.

Recipe Type:  Main Course
Cuisine:          South Indian/ Mangalorean/ Goan
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     30 minutes
Yield:              3 Servings

Ingredients:


8 small Ripe Mangoes
1 cup Desiccated Coconut
1 tsp Mustard seeds
2-3 Dry red chillies
2-3 Tbsp Jaggery or Sugar
A marble sized ball Tamarind (Optional)
8-10 Curry leaves
1/2 tsp Turmeric powder / Haldi (Optional)
A pinch Asafoetida / Hing (Optional)
2 tsp Oil
Salt
Water

Method:


1. Wash and peel the mangoes and keep aside
2. Soak the tamarind in half a cup of water and keep aside
3. Dry roast 1/2 tsp of the mustard seeds in a pan on low heat for 1 min. Be careful not to burn it otherwise the curry will turn bitter. 
4. Heat 1 tsp of the oil in the pan, add the red chillies and fry for 30 sec or until the chillies are crisp.
5. Grind the coconut, roasted mustard seeds and red chillies into a coarse paste with a little water. 
6. Heat the remaining oil and add the remaining mustard seeds
7. Once they splutter, add the curry leaves and lower the heat
8. Add the coconut paste, turmeric and asafoetida and mix well. Add 0.5 cup of water and simmer for 6-8 minutes. Turmeric and Asafoetida are used in the Goan version of the curry, while it is optional in the Mangalore version.
9. Slightly mash the mangoes and add to the curry
10. Add water to achieve the desired consistency. Add more if eating with rice and less if with bread.
11. Add salt and jaggery. Do not add all the jaggery at once, taste and add. If the mangoes are very sweet, you may not need much. 
12. Squeeze the tamarind in the water and remove the pulp. Add this sour liquid to the curry. Again, like the jaggery, do not add all the liquid at once, taste and add. If the mangoes are very sour, you may not need it.
13. Cook on low heat for 5 mins.
14. Serve warm with rice or bread.


sweet and sour mango curry, Mangalore pashingiri curry, Goan mango saasav, Konkani saasav



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Doddapatre Tambuli
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Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe [Video]


Bele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

I confess, I have a sweet tooth. From the first drop of honey that I tasted as a baby, I’ve had that weakness for sweets.

Time has proven, that my weakness for sweets is much stronger than my will power to ignore them. So instead of fighting a losing battle, I’ve given up and let myself enjoy them. After all, there is so much chaos and bitterness everywhere, at least my stomach can be full of sweetness.

Of all the sweets I know, Holige has always been the crown jewel. You know how cakes are synonymous with weddings in the West, to a Kannadiga (people of the state of Karnataka), a holige holds the same place. When you are unmarried, a lot of the older folks in the family will inevitably ask you when you will treat them to a feast with Holige, which is nothing, but a nice way of asking you the nosy question of when will you get married. I know this from experience *rolling eyes*.

So when we were planning our wedding menu and Raj declared he hates Holige, for a fleeting moment I wondered if he was the guy for me. Here I was in love with Holige, the quintessential wedding dessert and here was my man questioning its presence it our wedding. (May be he was jealous that I’ve loved it longer, who knows?). But my mom settled it by having 2 desserts, one that he liked and one that I liked. Wise woman. And both of us were happy.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread

Now, the Holige is not a very difficult dessert to make if you follow your instincts, but until recently, it was something that had to be made at home. No sweet shop ever stocked it, and even if they did, it was never as good as the homemade ones. But recently, I’ve seen a lot of holige shops spring up around the city and they make some really good ones there. You will know how fond people are of Holige by just looking at the crowd at these stores.

But we still love to make our own, because it is so easy and so delicious. A Holige is made of 2 components – the dough and the stuffing (also called hurna or puran). The dough can either be of only whole wheat flour (atta) or of only all purpose flour(maida) or a mix of the two. I’ve found that only whole wheat flour makes it slightly tougher in texture and only all purpose flour makes it chewier. The mix of flours works best for me. The stuffing is what gives flavor to the holige. Holige can be stuffed with a variety of things – lentils/dal, coconut, peanuts, and for the adventurous, there are dry fruits, dates and carrots too. While I love all varieties, this recipe is all about the lentil/dal or bele one. Chana Dal works best for Bele Holige.

To make the stuffing, chana dal is boiled, drained and pureed with very little water until smooth and then cooked with jaggery until it forms a thick paste. This is flavored with cardamom for the minimalist, while you can add other spices like dry ginger powder or fennel seeds powder etc. Getting the consistency of the stuffing right is what all the fuss is about in making the holige. Like I said before, follow your instincts, and you won’t falter. You should be able to take the stuffing in your hands (once cool) and shape it into a ball that holds its shape. If it sticks to your hands or doesn’t hold its shape, it needs to thicken further. Put it back on the heat and allow it to thicken. If the stuffing powders in your hands, add a little water or milk and make it thinner.

Once you have the right stuffing, the holige is very easy to make. Holige is traditionally pan fried with a lot of ghee, but to make it vegan, use vegetable oil. I’ve made it with oil too and it doesn’t affect the texture.

Holige tastes best when served warm, with lots of ghee or milk.

Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbread


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo @oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





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Bele Holige Recipe | Obbattu Recipe | Puran Poli Recipe


Bele holige, obbattu, puran poli, sweet lentil stuffed flatbreadBele Holige (Obbattu or Puran Poli) is a traditional Indian flatbread that is stuffed with a sweet lentil stuffing and pan fried in ghee. Popularly made for weddings and festivals.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:            Indian
Prep Time:     45 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     90 minutes
Yield:                Makes 10 to 12 medium Holige

Ingredients:


For the Stuffing (Hurna / Puran)


1 cup Chana Dal
1.5 cups Jaggery Powder
1 tsp Cardamom Powder

For the Dough:


2 cups Wholewheat Flour
1 cup All Purpose Flour
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
0.25 tsp Salt
Water as required

Ghee or Oil to fry

Method:


To make the Stuffing:


1. Wash the chana dal twice in water and then soak and leave aside for 30 minutes.
2. Pressure cook the chana dal with 2-3 cups of water until it is cooked. It may take 4-5 whistles or 8-10 minutes after the pressure builds up. If not using a pressure cooker, cook the chana dal in a covered pan until completely cooked.
3. Drain the chana dal and allow it to cool.
4. Once cool, blend it into a smooth paste. Use as little water as possible.
5. Heat a non stick kadhai and add the chana dal paste to it. If you are not using a non stick kadhai, add a little ghee first and then add the chana dal paste.
6. Add in the jaggery powder and mix well. If you want a mildly sweet holige, add only 1 cup of the jaggery powder. You can taste the stuffing and add more if required.
7. Continue cooking the stuffing on low heat while stirring frequently until the stuffing thickens. It may take 15-20 minutes.
8. Add in the cardamom powder and mix well. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
9. If the stuffing feels thin in consistency after cooling, add it back to a kadhai and heat it again until it reaches the desired consistency.
10. While the stuffing cools, make the dough for the holige.

To make the Dough:


11. To make the dough, take the wholewheat flour and all purpose flour in a large bowl. Add in the turmeric powder and salt.
12. Knead it to a smooth dough with water. Add water as required.
13. Cover the dough and rest for 30 minutes.

To make the Holige:


14. To make the holige, take a lime sized ball of dough and roll it out into a small disc on a flour dusted surface.
15. Take a lime sized ball of stuffing and place it on the rolled out dough.
16. Seal the edges and roll out the holige as thin as possible. Dust the holige with flour as required.
17. Heat a tava and grease it with ghee or oil. Place the holige on it.
18. Spoon ghee or oil on the other side of the holige.
19. Cook the holige on medium to high heat until both the sides are cooked.
20. Remove from heat and serve with ghee or milk.






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Misal Pav Recipe | How to make Misal Pav [Video]


Misal Pav Recipe. This video shows how to make popular Maharashtrian spicy vegan curry called Misal. Misal is a curry made with sprouts and coconut that is topped with Sev or Mixture and served with Pav.

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Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Bangalore has the weirdest weather of all places I've been to. It can be bright and sunny one day and pouring cats and dogs the next. We ran through October like it was Summer, barely a hint of chill in the air and the Sun was all powered on. And then we got loads of rain, just when I was ready to get those light trousers and leather footwear out !!  Finally, since mid-November, the chill has been setting in and it feels like Winter, at least in the evenings. The days are still as hot as Summer.

When it's cold outside, I want to stay cozy inside and eat warm spicy curries while lazily watching reruns of F.R.I.E.N.D.S. And this Misal Pav totally fits the bill. It is spicy, hearty and best of all, you can top it up with awesome crunchy things.

When I think of Misal Pav, it takes me back to my college days. Thursday night dinner in hostel was Misal Pav and it was actually horrible. If one were to eat that Misal Pav, one would never ever dare to eat one again. I don't know how the cooks in the hostel mess could mess up something so simple, but they managed to put up an unappetizing dish in the name of Misal Pav. It was only when I ate Misal Pav in a Maharashtrian restaurant that I came to appreciate the flavor and texture of this spicy vegan affair.

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav


Misal pav is a simple yet complex dish. It is simple to cook, but the flavors are complex, the textures are complex. Misal consists of 3 main things:

  • Usal - Usal is a quick curry made from sprouts. Sprouts are boiled with turmeric, salt and a little bit of asafoetida. You can add other spices to usal when you want to have it plain, but when you are cooking usal for Misal Pav, it is best to keep it simple. Generally, moth bean sprouts or matki sprouts are used for Misal Pav, but if you don't have moth beans, just use mung beans or any other sprouts that you can.
  • Kat - The spicy coconut based curry that dominates the flavor of Misal Pav is called the Kat. Kat is made by grinding together spices, coconut, onion and tomatoes and boiling them until the flavor develops. I have used Kokum as the souring agent in the Kat, you can use tamarind pulp instead. Kokum helps in giving a darker color to the Kat, that you may miss if you use tamarind. If you have access to Misal masala powder, then you can use that instead of the whole spices I have used.
  • Sev/Mixture/Farsan - This is the fun part of Misal Pav. Misal is always topped with crunchy spicy mixture. You can use any topping of your choice - papdi, ghatia, sev, chiwda etc. The more you add, the better it tastes. Only thing to remember is to add this at the end, while serving, else your mixture will get soggy and loose its texture and flavor.
Serve Misal with toasted Pav or regular bread. And always serve it piping hot!!

Spicy Maharashtrian Misal Pav

If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on FacebookTwitterInstagramPinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email



Video Recipe





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Misal Pav Recipe | How to make Misal Pav


Spicy Maharashtrian Misal PavMisal is a popular spicy vegan Maharashtrian curry that is served with Pav bread. Misal is made with sprouts and coconut and is topped with Sev or Mixture.

Recipe Type:  Curry
Cuisine:            Maharashtrian, Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Total time:     60 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2-3

Ingredients:


For the Usal:


2 cups Sprouts
2 Tbsp Oil
1 tsp Mustard Seeds
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
A pinch of Asafoetida (Hing)
Salt to taste
Water as required

For the Kat:


1 large Onion
1 large Tomato
0.5 cup grated Coconut
2 Tbsp Oil
1 Clove
1" Cinnamon
0.5 tsp Pepper
1-2 Bay leaves
1 tsp Coriander Powder
1 tsp Cumin Powder
1 Tbsp chopped Garlic
1 Tbsp chopped Ginger
2 tsp Red Chilli Powder
0.5 tsp Turmeric Powder
3-4 Kokum peels or 1 tsp Tamarind Pulp
1-2 cups Water
Salt to taste

To assemble the Misal:


1 Onion, finely chopped
1 Tomato, finely chopped
2 cups Sev or Mixture
0.5 cups Coriander leaves, finely chopped

Method:


To make the Usal:


1. Heat oil in a pan and add mustard seeds.
2. After the mustard seeds splutter, add the sprouts, turmeric powder, salt, asafoetida (hing) and 1 cup water. Cover and cook until the sprouts are cooked.
3. Grind the clove, cinnamon, pepper, ginger, garlic, coriander powder and cumin powder into a coarse masala without any water.

To make the Kat:


4. Soak the kokum peels in 0.5 cup warm water and keep aside.
5. Heat oil in a pan and add the coarsely ground masala.
6. Saute the masala until fragrant, then add chopped onion.
7. Once the onions are slightly browned, add in chopped tomato and grated coconut.
8. Fry for 2-3 minutes, then grind everything to a smooth paste with a little water.
9. Pour back the masala into the pan.
10. Add in turmeric powder, red chilli powder, salt, soaked kokum peels or tamarind pulp and 1 cup water. You can remove the kokum peels after a while if the gravy has reached the sourness you desire.
11. Allow it to come to a boil and let it boil for 8-10 minutes.
12. Adjust seasoning if required. Add more water for a looser consistency. If you want a thicker consistency, boil it longer.

To assemble the Misal Pav:


13. To serve the Misal Pav, add the usal in a bowl.
14. Pour over the spicy kat.
15. Top with finely chopped onion, tomatoes and coriander leaves.
16. Top with sev or mixture and serve with toasted pav.

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Alsane Tonak | Goan Pao Bhaji


How to make goan bhaji pao, alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
You know that feeling when you soooo want to eat something, you can already taste it before you have laid your hands on it, but it is so far away that you cannot reach it? Disappointed?

I miss Pao!!

Pao, sometimes called the lifeline of Goa, is a bread that was introduced to Goa by the Portuguese settlers and is by far the best bread I've ever had. Pao, sometimes called Pav, is available almost all through the country, but no one makes it the way it is made in Goa. It has a crusty outside and a chewy crumb; a texture that is just incomparable. Pao is such an integral part of Goan cuisine, that the Government actually subsidizes the cost of Pao.


I've pretty much eaten Pao every single day I lived in Goa. I've bought it for my grandparents when it cost as little as 25 Paise and today, when it costs 20 times more. I still wait for the Poder (local Pao seller) to come on his bicycle fixed with a cane basket in the back, honking his way through the meandering little streets bringing bread to every local man.

Look at this variety of wonderful Pao that I picked up on my recent vacation to Goa.

How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji, alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Just this week, I was in Goa. It was a short 5 day vacation where I met up with family and haunted all our favorite food joints across the state. While Bangalore is cosmopolitan and you pretty much get everything here, except probably the purple yam. I miss those certain somethings, that I took so much for granted when I stayed in Goa - a simple cheesy Mushroom Capsicum sandwich; Gobi Manchurian made exactly how it is supposed to be, fresh and with no food coloring; Chocolate cakes with chocolate cream that are to DIE for; that too sweet, yet perfectly enjoyable Badam Milk that you have to drink standing outside on the road; Samosa which has little pieces of beetroot in it along with the potato; that garlicky Batata Vada and lastly, loads and loads of Pao Bhaji. 

As much as I miss that wonderful Pao, I miss the coconut filled Bhaji too. It is pretty much my standard breakfast when I go to Goa. The Goan Pao Bhaji is very different from the Mumbai Pav Bhaji that is made with mashed potatoes and mixed vegetables. The Goan Pao Bhaji is usually made with some beans and coconut. Sometimes with Mushrooms too.

How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji, alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Goan bhaji is also called Tonak with Alsane Tonak being the popular one around. Alsane or Alsande are red cowpeas. To make Alsane Tonak, these red cowpeas are simmered in a spicy roasted coconut masala. 

To make Alsane Tonak, you need to coax the coconut gently to turn golden brown, before you grind it along with spices to make the Tonak gravy. This Alsane Tonak is not a recipe to be rushed, it encompasses the spirit of Goa - Relaxed, Sosegado... This is where you add all your love and patience into the otherwise simple gravy. The darker the color, the better the dish. However, don't burn it, trying to get it dark. 

When you go to a restaurant and ask for a "Mixed Bhaji", you will get the Tonak served with a helping of a simple Potato Bhaji on the side. So if the spice gets a bit much, let your next spoonful be the salty turmeric potatoes.

How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji,  alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

If you liked this, you may also like:




Alsane Tonak | Goan Pao Bhaji


How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji, alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.comAlsane Tonak is a Goan Pao Bhaji curry made by simmering red cowpeas in a spicy roasted coconut gravy.

Recipe Type:  Side
Cuisine:            Goan
Prep Time:     8 hours
Cook time:     1 hour
Yield:                Serves 4-5


Ingredients:


1 cup Red Cowpeas, dried
2 cups fresh Coconut, grated
2 Onions, chopped
1 Tbsp Coriander seeds
2-3 Cloves
5-6 Peppercorns
0.25" Cinnamon
1 Bay leaf, dried
2-3 dry Red Chillies
1/2 tsp Turmeric Powder
1 tsp Garam Masala
4-5 Kokum Peels or Marble sized Tamarind
2-3 cloves Garlic
0.5" Ginger
4-5 tsp Oil
Salt to taste
Water as required

Method:


Soak the cowpeas overnight or for 7-8 hours.
Drain the water and cook the cowpeas with 2 cups of water and 1/2 tsp Salt until done. The cowpeas should not be mushy, they should still have a bite. If using a pressure cooker to cook the peas, keep it for only 1-2 whistle and then release the pressure immediately, else they will overcook.
Drain the water and keep aside. Do not throw out the water, we use it later in the recipe.
Soak the kokum peels or tamarind in 1/2 cup of warm water and keep aside.
Heat 3 tsp Oil in a kadhai or pan and add half the onions.
Fry until the onions are translucent.
Now add the grated coconut and on low flame roast until the coconut turns golden brown. Stir occasionally to prevent the coconut from burning. This slow roasting takes time, almost half an hour.
When the coconut turns golden brown, add the cloves, cinnamon, bayleaf, peppercorns and dry red chillies and continue to roast for another 3-4 minutes.
Allow to cool, then add the turmeric powder and the water in which the Kokum or Tamarind was soaked and grind to a fine paste.
Crush the ginger and garlic into a coarse paste.
Heat the remaining oil in a pan and add the onions.
Fry until translucent. Now add the ginger-garlic paste and fry for 1 minute until fragrant.
Add the ground coconut masala and mix well.
Add the cooked cowpeas along with 0.75 cup water in which it was cooked.
Add salt if required.
Allow it to come to a boil, then cover and simmer for 4-5 minutes.
Serve hot along with Goan Pao or bread.


How to make goan bhaji pao, pav bhaji, alsanyache tondak at One Teaspoon Of Life www.oneteaspoonoflife.com




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Mushroom Cafreal


Mushroom Cafreal is a Goan semi dry curry made my stir frying mushrooms marinated in a coriander based green sauce.

How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


This Mushroom Cafreal was the perfect finish to my weekend. I spent some quality time with my favorite girl in the whole wide universe and I had to end the day with some real quality food. 

What quality time you ask? With whom you ask?

I spent my weekend strolling through crowded lanes of local markets with my favorite girl, my sis Gee - some real awesome quality Sister Time. We went to the old Bangalore areas of Chickpet, Raja Market, Baba Market and walked through lanes and little markets that we had never seen before. While we did not have any real shopping to do, we literally bought nothing - NA DA, we did something we hadn't done in such a long time. We did this a lot when we were both single and had all the time in the world to do what we do best - Window Shopping! We'd pick a street or a market and walk through it gazing at all the goods, barely stopping for a meal. That's exactly what we did, we walked, talked and laughed and ate just one Vada-Pav each and came back.

And as a plus point, in a totally unexpected little corner, I found a dry fruit store that pretty much has every nut and seed that I've only read of in recipes but never set my eyes upon. They had pecans and cranberries and pine nuts and hazelnuts etc etc. That tiny shop packed a punch. I'm so excited about my find!! Now all I need to do is find awesome recipes, so I can go back there and buy whatever nut I need.

How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Back to my dish of the day - Mushroom Cafreal. Although Cafreal is usually made with chicken, but this vegetarian option also rocks!

This Mushroom Cafreal is absolute MAGIC. The mushrooms are full of texture, and the green sauce is a full on flavor bomb. Mushrooms are always great, I simply LOVE Mushrooms. But if you don't replace the mushroom in this recipe with potatoes or cauliflower and it will taste just as awesome. I did make a Potato version for Raj and he loved it.

This Mushroom Cafreal is a game changer. Most people's idea of a curry is something that starts with roasting spices and involves cooking slowly on the stove top until everything comes together to get a balance of flavors. But this curry is nothing like it. It has only three steps - blending, marinating and frying. Of course, there are spices involved, but no roasting or frying them. And no slow cooking at all. Apart from the marination time, this curry is complete from start to finish in almost 30 minutes. Yes, that's it - Half an Hour!!

How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
The Cafreal is all about the sauce, that is also the marinade. It is such a simple simple sauce yet so delicious and versatile. It can be used not just for making Cafreal, but also in Biryani or to add zing to so many other curries. The green sauce is made of humble ingredients - fresh Coriander leaves, Onions, Garlic, Green Chillies, Cinnamon, Cloves, Cumin, Pepper, Sugar, Oil and Limes. While the traditional recipe may call for vinegar, I can't stand it's smell, and I also prefer the freshness of the limes over the vinegar, so I used lime juice. To make the marinade, just grind everything with a little water. You can store this in a glass jar in the fridge for 1-2 weeks. Add salt whenever you are using it.

Rub in the marinade to halved mushrooms and let them soak in all that goodness for at least an hour. Then heat oil in a pan and stir fry chopped capsicum and onions. Once they have softened slightly, add the mushroom and fry on medium heat for 5-6 minutes. Then add the remaining sauce and a little water and cook until the mushrooms are done to your liking. Garnish with coriander and lime and serve it with Pao or bread.

How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
If you liked this, you may also like:

  • Saasav - Goan curry made with ripe mangoes and coconut.
  • Vegetable Jalfrezi - Quick tomato based gravy made with mix vegetables and paneer.
  • Mushroom Biryani - Mushroom Biryani is Basmati rice cooked along with whole spices and mushrooms.

Mushroom Cafreal


How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Mushroom Cafreal curry at www.oneteaspoonoflife.comMushroom Cafreal is a semi dry vegan Goan curry made by stir frying mushrooms marinated in a quick spicy coriander sauce.

Recipe Type:  Main
Cuisine:            Goan
Prep Time:     1 Hour 30 minutes
Cook time:     30 minutes
Yield:                Serves 2

Ingredients:


10-12 Mushrooms
2 cups Coriander leaves, tightly packed
4-5 Garlic Cloves
1" Cinnamon stick
0.5 tsp Cumin seeds
4 Cloves
1 tsp Coriander Powder
1/4 tsp Cumin Seeds
2-3 Green Chilli
8-10 Peppercorns
2 Onions
0.5 Capsicum
1 Lime
4-5 tsp Oil
1 tsp Sugar
Water as required

Method:


Blend together the coriander leaves, 1 onion, garlic, green chillies, cinnamon, cumin seeds, peppercorns, cloves, lime juice and sugar with 1-2 Tbsp of water into a smooth paste to make the marinade.
Halve the mushrooms and rub in 3/4th the marinade, 2 tsp Oil and salt as required into them. Cover and keep aside for at least 1 hour.
Heat the remaining oil in a pan and add the marinated mushrooms.
Fry the mushrooms on low to medium heat until slightly browned while stirring occasionally. It takes around 4-5 minutes.
Add in the remaining marinade and 1/2 cup of water. Adjust the salt and sugar as required.
Cook on low heat for 8-10 minutes.
Serve hot with bread.


How to make vegan Goan Portuguese Cafreal at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


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