Showing posts with label Festival. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Festival. Show all posts

Traditional Chakli Recipe | How to make Chaki [Video]

Yum

Chakli is a deep fried savory Indian snack that is popularly made for Diwali. Chakli is a spiral snack made from rice and black lentil (urad dal) flour and can be enjoyed in a gluten free diet. This recipe will show to how to make chakli from scratch along with a video tutorial.

In a hurry? Jump to Video or Jump to Recipe

traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snack

Soooo.... this post comes almost a month later than what it should have been posted. I had planned to post this Chakli recipe before Diwali, so you guys could try it for Diwali. But I totally missed it. I thought of waiting for next year to post it, but then who has the patience to wait another year. And I figured out, you don't need Diwali around to make Chakli, you can make it anytime you like. With cold weather coming our way, the demand for deep fried goodness is only going to go up. So here's the recipe for the crispy crunchy Chakli.

There are several variations of the Chakli - Palak Chakli, Butter Chakli and what my friend told me recently, there's even an Jalapeno Chakli out there. But this is the recipe for the traditional chakli.

traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snack

traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snack

Some background.

It’s been years that I have been planning to cook snacks and sweets for Diwali and restart our old tradition of visiting friends and family and sharing those delicacies with them. But for the last 2 years, I’ve been out of country for Diwali (visiting Bali and Cambodia). So while I made elaborate plans on what to cook and how to box them, it never materialized. But this Diwali was different, I was in country and better yet, I was in Goa. Gee and I split up the dishes and managed to put up two savory and two sweets on the plate. It was such a delight!

I had several ideas for the savory snack and while I had Chakli at the back of my mind, Gee picked it too. Chakli was what my mom made every Diwali when we were little and gave it to everyone in the apartment complex. And this year, I restarted that tradition.

I made Chakli several times in the last one month, I made trial batches and I made more batches for distributing. With all the Chakli making so fresh in my mind, I'm at my best to give you all the tips and tricks required to make the perfect Chakli. There are several small things that impact how your Chakli turns out, and I have included it in the Notes section at the bottom of the recipe. Who knew, that things like humidity and temperature could affect your Chakli?

There are different varieties of Chakli Press available in the market, you can buy:

  • Stainless Steel Ones -  
  • Brass ones -             
  • Wooden ones  from local markets.

traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snack


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com I'd love to see what you are upto.


If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 



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Video Recipe





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Traditional Chakli Recipe


traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snackChakli is a savory deep fried Indian snack that is popularly made for Diwali. Chakli is a crispy spiral snack made from rice and lentil flour. It is a spicy crunchy vegetarian snack.

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:            South Indian
Prep Time:     10 hours
Cook time:     60 minutes
Total time:     10 hours 40 minutes
Yield:                80-90

Ingredients:


3 cups or 570 gms raw Rice
1 cup or 190 gms Urad Dal
0.75 cup or 75 gms Ghee
0.5 cup Oil
5 tsp Cumin Seeds
2 tsp Red Chilli Powder
1 tsp Asafoetida (Hing)
2-4 tsp Salt
3-4 cups Water
Oil to fry
Water as required

Method:


To make the Chakli Flour:


1. Wash and drain the rice. Spread it on a dry muslin cloth in a single layer to dry overnight or for 8-10 hours.
2. Once the rice is dry, dry roast it in a kadhai until all the moisture evaporates and the rice turns bright white. Roast on low flame by stirring occassionally. Do not allow the rice to change color or burn. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
3. Dry roast the urad dal on low heat until it turns pinkish-brown. The dal will turn fragrant once roasted well. Stir occassionally and do not allow the dal to burn. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
4. Once the rice and urad dal have cooled, grind it into a smooth powder in batches. You can either do this at home in a mixer or get it powdered at a mill.
5. Sieve the flour to remove any unpowdered rice or dal.
6. With the quantities used in this recipe, you should get around 750-760gms of chakli flour.

To make the Chakli:


7. Grind 3 tsp of cumin seeds into a coarse powder. Alternately you can use roasted cumin powder.
8. Add the cumin seed powder to the chakli flour.
9. Next add in the red chilli powder, remaining cumin seeds, hing and 2 tsp of salt and mix it roughly. Hing or asafoetida may contain wheat and hence avoid it if making a gluten free version.
10. Add in melted ghee and rub it in the flour.
11. Add hot oil by the spoonfuls and rub it in the flour. Squeeze a bit of the flour in your palms, if it holds the shape, you can stop adding oil. If it crumbles away, add more oil and mix.
12. Once you have added all the oil, add in water slowly and start kneading until you have a smooth dough. Adjust seasoning or spices as you continue to knead.
13. Once you have a smooth dough, cover with a wet cloth and keep aside.
14. Grease the chakli press well.
15. Take a ball of dough and stuff it in the chakli press.
16. Press out the chaklis onto a smooth plastic sheet.
17. Heat oil in a kadhai for deep frying. Add a small piece of flour to test the oil. If the piece floats up, the oil is hot enough.
18. Once the oil is hot, carefully pick up the chakli and add it to the oil. Fry in batches and do not crowd the kadhai.
19. Once you have added the first batch of chaklis, lower the heat to a minimum and allow to cook for 4-5 minutes. Depending on the quantity of oil you have in the kadhai and the stove settings, you may require more or less time than what is mentioned. Try a test batch first to get the time and temperature of the stove correct. See notes for more tips.
20. Remove from oil and place it onto a absorbent kitchen towel to cool.
21. Once cool, store in an airtight box.
22. Serve at room temperature with tea.

Notes:


  1. To make the chakli gluten free, do not add hing or asafoetida.
  2. To make the chakli vegan, you can replace ghee with oil.
  3. To make the chakli richer tasting, the oil can be replaced with ghee or butter. Butter can also be used in place of ghee or oil completely.
  4. If you are making chakli for the first time, it is better to make the dough in small batches, so that you can correct the next batch if required. Humidity and temperature in your house may change the amount of ghee/oil required in your recipe, a trial batch will help get that quantity right.
  5. If the chaklis start breaking when you try to shape them, then add more water to the dough and try again. The water can be added to small batches of dough as you go along.
  6. If the chaklis start breaking in the oil while frying, that means the amount of ghee or oil added to the dough is more than required. Add it a little dry flour and knead again.
  7. The chakli flour can be stored for 1-2 months in a dry airtight container.
  8. The chakli dough cannot be stored and it is recommended to make chakli with fresh dough.
  9. Cooking the chakli is the trickiest part, make sure the oil is hot when you drop in the chaklis, after that set the stove to sim or minimum heat. Cook on a low temperature until crispy. The high temperature gives color to the chakli while the low temperature cooks it all the way through making it crispy. It is recommended to make a few trial batches so that you get the temperature and time required in your environment.
  10. Allow the chaklis to cool completely before storing, else they may get soft.

traditional Indian chakli, savory deep fried snack



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How to make shakkarpara recipe, shankarpole recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Shankarpole

Nippattu
popular Indian snack - baked flat discs made of four and spices
Baked Papdi




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Ram Navami special Panaka recipe | Panakam Recipe

Yum

Panaka or Panakam is a traditional Indian cooler popular during Summers in South India!!


Traditional South Indian summer cooler


Traditional South Indian summer cooler

Panaka or Panakam is a traditional Indian cooler popular during Summers in South India. It is served along with spice buttermilk and a lentil salad called kosambri during the festival of Ram Navami.

This was one of those posts with a writer's block. I did not want to write about the weather, I did not want to write about my memories or childhood. Nothing special happened this week either. So I was kind of lost.  I started to write, then deleted it at least 3 times!!

So now I have settled on just talking about the ingredients that make up this mocktail like drink called Panaka.

Traditional South Indian summer cooler

Traditional South Indian summer cooler

Panaka is sweet, mildly tangy, warm with the ginger, earthy because of tulsi or holy basil and fragrant from the freshly ground cardamom. It is very similar to a lemonade but with different proportions.

One of the main ingredients in Panaka is jaggery. Jaggery is unrefined cane sugar. The closest in texture is Muscovado sugar. Jaggery has a complex flavor profile as compared to regular refined sugar. The darker the jaggery, the more complex the flavor. Dark jaggery is the least refined and purified, while the yellow jaggery has less impurities. With people looking for more organic stuff these days, the organic brown jaggery has become very popular.

Ginger is added for its health benefits. It is known to cleanse the body of toxins. If you cannot find fresh ginger, you can substitute it with dry ginger powder. Ginger also adds an earthy flavor to the drink while making it mildly hot.

Traditional South Indian summer cooler


Cardamom is the main flavoring agent. I used fresh cardamom pods that I lightly crushed with a mortar and pestle. You can use a store bought cardamom powder, but I highly recommend making it yourself.

Tulsi or Holy Basil leaves are added for health reasons again. I did not have any readily available, so I substituted with home grown mint leaves.

The squirt of lime is optional, but recommended. Some folks use a tamarind juice instead. You can add any souring agent, just don't let it get overpowering. Panaka is much milder than a regular lemonade. The predominant flavor is from jaggery and the cardamom.

Traditional South Indian summer cooler


Traditional South Indian summer cooler



If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook, tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com. I'd love to see what you are upto. 

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 

You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email

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Ram Navami special Panaka recipe | Panakam Recipe


Traditional South Indian summer coolerPanaka or Panakam is a traditional Indian cooler popular during Summers in South India.

Recipe Type:  Beverage
Cuisine:            South Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     0 minutes
Yield:                Serves 6-8

Ingredients:


1.5 litres Water
1.5 cups powdered Jaggery
6-8 green Cardamoms
2-3 Tbsp grated Ginger
1 lime
A handful of Tulsi or Mint leaves

Method:


Crush the seeds of the cardamom until fine.
Add the cardamom, grated ginger, powdered jaggery and juice of 1 lime to the water and stir until the jaggery has dissolved.
Add the tulsi leaves or mint leaves.
Refrigerate until serving.
Strain before serving. Serve chilled



Traditional South Indian summer cooler



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Tendle Bibbe Upkari

Yum

Fresh tender Cashew Nuts!!! This Konkani new year dish lets you enjoy the creamy tender nuts in a mild fry with ivy gourds and potatoes.

Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Fresh Cashew Nuts!! I cannot believe I was oblivious to their existence. Being Goan, my love for cashew nuts is obvious. But until today, all I had was dried cashew nuts, sometimes salted, mostly plain, sometimes flavored and once or twice, I have mustered courage to eat the fruit that causes throats to itch. Somehow, I totally missed getting on the fresh tender cashew nuts wagon, until now, of course. My friend Vindhya of A Million Morsels, introduced me to this tender creamy crunchy delicacy. 

So when Raj went to Karkala for an extended vacation for Ugadi (Hindu New Year), he got me these tender cashew nuts or bibbo/ bibbe. They are sold in packets of 50 or 100 and are very seasonal. They are usually sold around Ugadi as this Tendle Bibbe Upkari is a specialty for Ugadi in a Konkani household. If you cannot find tender cashew nuts, you can replace them with dried cashew nuts that have been soaked in water overnight or for 4-5 hours until they are nice and soft.

Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Upkari is a simple palya or a dry vegetable curry. It is also super healthy, low on oil, high on seasonal ingredients, barely any spices. It is a refreshing fresh dish fit for Summer.
Tendle or Tendli / Tondekayee or Ivy gourds is the fruit of a creeper. Tastes best when harvested when they are raw and tender and green. As they ripen, they become red and soft. Ripe tendle can be used to make Tondekayee Chutney. My luck shined when Raj got me home grown fresh tendle from Karkala. I am a big fan of anything home grown and organic. The tendle he got me were so tender and cooked so quickly. They were delicate and crisp, just the way I love them.

Potatoes, you can add them or you can leave them. Sometimes, if one cannot find tender cashews or not enough of them, the quantity of the upkari is increased by adding more potato. I put them in as everyone loves potatoes. 

Coconut, another homegrown ingredient in my cooking. I feel so lucky to get homegrown coconut. I don't grow them in Bangalore, but every time someone comes from Karkala, my mother in law makes it a point to send me coconuts grown at home. They are huge, sweet and juicy.. YUM!! The coconut here is much more than just a garnish, it is almost the heart of the dish that brings everything together. 

This Tendle Bibbe Upkari has very little in the way of spices, just mustard seeds, urad dal and red chillies with a sprig of curry leaves. It uses very little oil, it is mostly cooked in water. As I said, it is very healthy. Tendle Bibbe Upkari is eaten as a side along with rice and dal or with chapati.

Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


If you made this recipe, let me know! Leave a comment here or on Facebook, tag your tweet with @oneteaspoonlife on Twitter and don't forget to tag your photo #oneteaspoonoflife on Instagram. You can also email me at onetspoflife@gmail.com. I'd love to see what you are upto. 

If you like this recipe, do not forget to share it with your friends and family! 

You can follow One Teaspoon Of Life is there on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ or you can subscribe to One Teaspoon Of Life and receive all the latest updated via Email (How convenient!!)


If you liked this, you may also like:





Tendle Bibbe Upkari


Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.comTendle Bibbe Upkari is a Konkani vegatable dish made with fresh tender cashew nuts, tendle or ivy gourd and potatoes. It is usually made during Ugadi.

Recipe Type:  Side
Cuisine:            Mangalore
Prep Time:     1 Hour
Cook time:     40 minutes
Yield:                Serves 3-4


Ingredients:


20-25 Tendle (Tondekayee or Ivy Gourd)
1 cup Bibbe or tender Cashew Nuts
1-2 Potatoes
3 tsp Oil
1/2 tsp Mustard Seeds
1/2 tsp Urad Dal
3-4 dry Red Chillies
2 Tbsp grated fresh Coconut
8-10 Curry leaves
Water as required
Salt to taste

Method:


Boil 2 cups of water. Remove from heat once it comes to a rolling boil.
Soak the cashew nuts (bibbe) in the hot water for 1 hour. This will help loosen the skin.
Peel the thin brown skin of the tender cashew nuts.
Wash the cashew nuts thoroughly and split them into halves.
Cut the tips of the tendle and slice it into thin slices.
Peel the potato and slice them to the same size as the tendle
Heat oil in a kadhai and add the mustard seeds.
Once the mustard seeds splutter, add the urad dal, curry leaves and the dry red chillies.
Fry until the urad dal changes colour.
Add the sliced tendle and 0.5 cup of water.
Cover and cook until the tendle are half done.
Add the sliced potato and the tender cashew nuts.
Cover and cook until the potato and tendle are done.
Add salt and mix well.
Garnish with grated coconut.
Serve hot with chapati.


Konkani Recipes, how to make bibbe upkari recipe, how to cook tender cashew nuts, how to make tondekayee palya with cashew nuts recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com



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Wedding Anniversary Gajar ka Halwa

Yum
5 years of love, 5 years of disagreements.
5 years of understanding, 5 years of why-can’t-you-understand-me moments.
5 years in happiness and sadness. 5 years of ups and downs.
5 years of sharing work, 5 years of fighting over the TV remote.
5 years of buying new stuff, 5 years of we-really-need-to-get-rid-of-stuff.

How to make gajar ka halwa or carrot halwa recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

5 years since we tied the knot. Sunday, the 16th was our 5th Wedding Anniversary. Somehow, being as different as chalk and cheese we’ve made it work. 
10 years ago, I saw him across the room and wanted to get to know him. I did get to know him a few months later. We became friends, very good friends. Friends who fell in love eventually.

Raj is probably the nicest guy around. A man who hurts not even a mosquito (literally!!), much to my annoyance. A man with immense patience - he can entertain toddlers for hours and teach technology to senior citizens. But totally loses it when someone cuts in front of his car breaking traffic rules. A man who sings well but has two left feet when it comes to dancing (he may as well be fighting Kung Fu with me). Totally low maintenance guy, whom I love very much, no matter how much he annoys me at times.


Today morning as I was waiting for the bus, I was trying to think of the things we have in common and while we are more different than similar, we do have quite a lot of stuff in common…

  • Travel – We both love to travel, we’ve always loved to see new places and take long drives. We loved the snowcapped peaks of Manali just as much as the pristine waters of Phuket. We were equally mesmerized by the Taj Mahal as we were by the Sigiriya Rock in Sri Lanka.
  • Desserts – Both of us have a massive sweet tooth and are always trying to curb it. But yes, desserts are our weakness, no matter how much we try.
  • Movies – We may have different tastes in movies, I love rom coms and he love his action movies (typical Man.. Duh!), but give us an Animated Movie and we are willing to tolerate the headache we both get from the 3D glasses.
  • Jamie Oliver and Top Gear – He’s all about cars and I’m all food, but for a change we both love watching Jamie Oliver cook things we would probably never eat and watch them test drive cars on Top Gear that we will never buy.
  • Tea – Tea is what led to this marriage according to me. We bonded over cups and cups of tea and still cannot get enough of.

How to make gajar ka halwa or carrot halwa recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

This Gajar ka Halway is a dedication to our 5 years of Marriage. 5 years ago, just before we got married, Raj told me he makes the most amazing Gajar ka Halwa and will one day make it for me. I’m still waiting for him to make it… I probably will be waiting for the next 5.  So instead of denying myself of the sinful pleasure, I made it myself. 

Gajar ka Halwa or Carrot Halwa is a traditional North Indian carrot pudding that is made by slow cooking grated carrots along with milk, sugar, ghee and dry fruits. It is a sweet rich dessert, fit for special occasions, like our Wedding Anniversary.

You can either grate the carrots or use a food processor to shred them. Use juicy carrots, avoid fibrous ones. The grated carrots are first lightly roasted in ghee. Then they are slow cooked in milk on low heat. Traditional recipe uses full fat milk. I used regular toned milk. Once the milk has almost evaporated, add the sugar. The sugar will melt and you will again find liquid in your halwa. I love some desserts very sweet. Adding the 1 cup of sugar will make the halwa very sweet. I suggest adding half a cup and letting it evaporate, before adding more if you prefer your desserts to be less sweet. Once all the sugar has evaporated, add the cardamom powder. I also love adding a lot of dry fruits to my desserts. I added almonds, cashew nuts and raisins after lightly frying them in ghee. 

Although I love cold Gajar ka Halwa, it tastes best when served warm. It also is great when paired with a scoop of Vanilla Ice Cream.

How to make gajar ka halwa or carrot halwa recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

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P.S - You know my biggest accomplishment? After 5 years, I finally got him to smile when the camera is pointed at him.

Gajar ka Halwa | Carrot Halwa


How to make gajar ka halwa or carrot halwa recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.comGajar ka Halwa or Carrot Halwa is a slow cooked North Indian carrot pudding made with grated carrots, milk, sugar, ghee and dry fruits.

Recipe Type:  Breakfast
Cuisine:            North Indian
Prep Time:     15 minutes
Cook time:     1 Hour 45 Minutes
Yield:                Serves 5 to 6


Ingredients:


3 cups grated Carrots (300 gms)
2 cups Milk
0.75 to 1 cup Sugar
0.5 tsp Cardamom Powder
3 Tbsp Ghee
8 to 10 Almonds
8 to 10 Cashew nuts
8 to 10 Raisins

Method:


Heat 2 Tbsp ghee in a kadhai and add the grated carrot.
On low heat, fry the carrots for 4-5 mins, stirring continuously.
Add the milk and continue to simmer on low heat until all the milk has evaporated. Stir occasionally.
This will take around 30-45 minutes. By the time the milk has evaporated, the carrots would have almost cooked.
Now add the sugar and continue to cook on low heat. The sugar will melt and the halwa will again have liquid in it. Continue to stir occasionally.
Once all the liquid has evaporated, add the cardamom powder and mix well.
Remove from heat.
Heat the remaining ghee in a small pan.
Add sliced almonds, split cashew nuts and raisins and saute until the nuts brown slightly.
Add the nuts to the Gajar ka Halwa and mix well.
Serve warm.

How to make gajar ka halwa or carrot halwa recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


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Nippattu | Thattai

Yum
Same story as my Kaju Katli post. I asked hubby dearest what khara/ namkeen/ spicy snack should I make for Diwali and the reply was Nippattu. Again, I had tried this earlier and it was something I couldn't brag about. Tried it again and presto! it tasted good this time. I did struggle a little initially even this time, but I got the correct advice from multiple people and managed to salvage my nippattu mission. I was not rolling them thin enough and hence they were not cooking properly in the center giving them soft centers and crispy sides. After about 7-10 turning out soft, I took the advice and patted them out evenly and thinner and they turned out nice and crisp. The recipe made close to 40 nippattus.




Nippattu | Thattai


Spicy flat South Indian crisps made from Rice flour

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     30 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Yield:              40

Ingredients:

2 cups Rice flour
1 cup Maida / Flour
1-2 tsp Red chilli powder
50 gms or 3 Tbsp Butter
2 Tbsp Oil (hot)
2-3 sprigs Curry leaves
2 Tbsp Coriander leaves (chopped)
1/2 cup Peanuts
1/4 cup Puthani / Roasted gram
1/4 tsp Asafoetida / Hing
A pinch of Cooking soda
Salt
Water
Oil for deep frying

Method:

  • Dry roast the peanuts and peel them. Crush the peanuts into 2-3 pieces, just be careful not to powder it.
  • Mix the rice flour, maida, red chilli powder, butter, chopped curry leaves, coriander leaves, peanuts, roasted gram, hing, cooking soda and salt.
  • Heat 2 tbsp of oil and add to the mix.
  • Add water and knead into a smooth dough.
  • Cover and keep aside for 10-15 mins
  • Take a small ball of dough and place it on a butter paper or any other greased surface and pat it down into a disk using your fingers. The disk should be around 2mm in thickness. Make sure it is evenly thick.
  • Heat the oil in a kadhai for deep frying. After the oil is hot, reduce the stove to medium flame.
  • Deep fry the nippattu on medium flame until they are brown on both sides.
  • Allow it to cool a little to check if they have crisped up.
  • Allow it to cool and then store in an air tight container.

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Kaju Katli | Cashew Barfi

Yum
I asked hubby dearest what he wanted for Diwali and pat came the reply "Kaju katli"... I had given it a try last Diwali and although it tasted wonderful, it never set :( So this year with renewed enthusiasm, I decided to try it again... It ended up being perfect this year and I believe all of us have put on a few pounds thanks to the perfect homemade kaju katlis. The below recipe made around 20-25.




Kaju Katli | Cashew Barfi


Fudge made with cashewnuts

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Yield:              20-25

Ingredients:

1 cup Cashew
1/2 cup Sugar (heaped)
1/4 cup Water
2 Tbsp Milk
Ghee for greasing / Butter paper

Method:

  • Powder the cashew into a fine powder.
  • Add sugar and water to a kadhai (Preferably non-stick), and allow it to come to a boil while stirring.
  • Keep the stove on medium/low flame and keep stirring frequently.
  • The test to check if the sugar syrup has reached the desired consistency is simple, keep a small bowl of water at room temperature next to you. Spill a drop of the sugar syrup into this bowl, if it dissolves immediately, the sugar syrup still needs to thicken. If it forms a thread that does not dissolve even when touched, the sugar syrup has reached the desired consistency.
  • Now add the cashew powder and keep stirring until the dough becomes one mass.
  • The check if the dough has reached the desired consistency, wet your finger and take a small piece of dough and roll it between your finger, if it forms a non sticky ball, the dough is done.
  • Remove from heat and move into a different bowl or plate.
  • While the dough is still warm, start kneading it. If it feels too dry, add the milk and knead until the cashew leaves oil.
  • Grease a plate and place the dough on it or place the dough on a piece of butter paper.
  • Roll out the dough to desired thickness (appx. 4-5mm).
  • Cut into diamond shape using a sharp knife.
  • Allow it to cool for 1-2 hours before separating the barfis.
  • Store in a cool dry place. Refrigerate after 2 days as it contains milk.



Note/ Tips:

1) In case you overgrind the cashew, it will form small lumps. Do not fret, these will be smoothed out in the end while kneading.
2) I used half cashews, and when I ground them, I still had 1 cup of cashew powder. If we use full cashews, we may get more or less than 1 cup of powder. We need 1 cup of cashew powder.
3) After removing it from the stove, the dough is very hot, use gloves while kneading
4) In case the dough looks brittle and forms hard lumps after removing from heat, allow it to cool a little, and then pulse it in the mixer until all lumps are broken and you get a fine powder. Knead this powder along with milk to get a smooth dough.
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Khova Peda

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A free Saturday morning got me in experimental mood. I'm generally stay away from making sweets unless it's a special occasion or a festival, but this Saturday I was in the mood for something sweet. And without any recipe in hand, I decided to make khova pedas. Luckily for me, they turned out great.

Khova peda


Khova

Khova peda



Khova Peda


Cardamom flavored milk fudge

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          North Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     90 minutes
Yield:              20-25

Ingredients:

1 litre full fat Milk or 3/4 cup Khova
5-6 tbsp Powdered sugar
2-3 Cardamom
5-6 Almonds(Optional)

Method:
  • I made fresh khova, 1 litre of milk gave me 3/4 cup of khova. You can use store bought khova too.
  • Add 1 L of full fat milk into a non-stick pan.
  • Allow the milk to come to a boil and then lower the flame to low.
  • Keep stirring occasionally. I stirred once every 5 mins.
  • Once most of the milk has evaporated and you can see mostly milk solids, keep a close watch on the pan, you don't want to burn the whole thing. Stirring may be frequently needed.
  • Powder the cardamom and add to pan. Mix well.
  • Add the sugar by the spoonful until you get the desired sweetness. I added 5.5 tbsp. of powdered sugar.
  • Keep stirring and cooking until the whole mixture is one mass and sticks together.
  • Remove from the stove and cool for 10-15 mins, until you can shape them into pedas
  • Roll the dough into small balls and flatten them
  • Garnish with slivers of almond
  • Allow it to cool and then serve
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Kadle Bele Payasa | Chana Dal Payasam

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Guysss !!! "100" H-U-N-D-R-E-D... This is my 100th post on OneTeaspoonOfLife...

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

My first milestone in my blogging journey. Ever since I reached the nervous 90's, I started thinking about what my 100th post should be. I asked for suggestions from family, but I was more confused than ever. I wanted it to be something sweet, something influenced by my roots and most of all, something I love.

Kadle Bele Payasa has been a favourite since childhood. And to top it, this was a part of the naivedyam (offering) to Lord Ganesha for Ganesh Chaturthi. I made it long back, but held on, on posting it, so I could make it my 100th. So blessed by Lord Ganesha, comes my 100th recipe on this blog for the simple, delicate and delicious Kadle Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam.

Kadle Bele Payasa is a South Indian Kheer or pudding made using Chana Dal (Split Bengal Gram) and Rice. The dal and rice are cooked in coconut milk along with cardamom and jaggery.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

The base of this payasa or kheer is the Chana Dal. The dal needs to be soaked for at least 2-3 hours to make cooking it easier. I pressure cooked it, but you can easily cook it in a deep saucepan. Usually, dal is cooked until it disintegrates and is mushy, but not in this case. The dal should be just cooked. It should still retain its shape and should still have a slight bite to it.

The other major ingredient here is the rice. And just like the chana dal, it needs to be just cooked. The rice grains should not be mushy. They should still have a bite to them.

Coconut is the soul of South India and also of this Kadle Bele Payasa. The Kadle Bele Payasa gets its creaminess from coconut. You can add coconut milk or finely ground coconut flesh. I sometimes add coconut milk and sometimes the ground coconut. The difference is not in taste, but in texture. Coconut milk gives it smooth creaminess while the ground coconut gives the payasa a coarse texture.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Jaggery is unrefined cane sugar. If you don't have access to jaggery, you can add palm sugar or brown sugar or any unrefined sugar. If you are using jaggery, I suggest using the darkest variety you get. Dark jaggery has the least amount of additives it in and has a richer taste.
No Indian sweet is complete without ground Cardamom. Just the fragrance of cardamom reminds me of dessert.

Dry fruits are totally optional for this Kadle Bele Payasa, but I don't know any dish where the addition of dry fruits has ruined it. Add them just chopped or fry them in ghee like I did. If you are vegan or want to make a vegan dessert, skip the ghee and just lightly toast the dry fruits. I added cashew nuts and raisins, you can add almonds as well.

If you are making this for Naivedyam or as an offering to god, refrain from tasting it. Follow the recipe and you should be good. Hold off on the jaggery if you are concerned it being too sweet while offering it in Naivedyam. You can heat a little water and dissolve jaggery in it and mix it to the payasa while eating.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

If you liked this, you may also like:
  • Modak - Modaks are traditional steamed Indian dumpling made from rice flour, coconut and jaggery. Served as an offering to Lord Ganesha in West and South India. 
  • Coconut Laddoo - Instant Fudge balls made with coconut and condensed milk.
  • Mavinahannu Seekarne - Maavina Hannu Seekarne or Aamras is a simple traditional dessert made with mango pulp and milk and flavored with cardamom.



Kadle bele payasa | Chana dal payasam

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Kadle Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam is a South Indian kheer or pudding made with rice, lentils and fresh coconut.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     2 Hours (Includes lentil soaking time)
Cook time:     60 minutes
Yield:              2-3 Servings

Ingredients:


0.5 cup Kadle bele / Chana dal
2-3 Tbsp Cooked rice
0.5 cup desiccated fresh Coconut or 1 cup Coconut Milk
0.5 cup Jaggery (grated or shaved)
1 tsp or 4 pods of Cardamom
8-10 Cashew nuts(Split) (Optional)
8-10 Kismis / Raisins(Optional)
1 Tbsp Ghee (Optional)
Water as required

Method:


Soak the kadle bele for 2-3 hours.
Pressure cook it with water until done. It should be cooked but not mushy. I cooked it in 2 cups of water for around 10 mins/ 2-3 whistles.
Pour the kadle bele along with 1 cup of the water it was cooked in, into a kadhai. Keep the flame low.
Add the cooked rice to it.
If using coconut milk, just pour it to the kadhai with the kadle bele and rice. If using fresh cococut, grind it with water until it is is fine and then add this to the kadhai.
Add the grated jaggery and cardamom and cook for 5-10 mins until the jaggery melts and mixes evenly. I suggest adding it by the spoonful until the sweetness is right for you. Add water as required. The consistency is usually on the thicker side.
In another small pan, heat the ghee and lightly fry the cashew nuts and raisins until the cashews are light brown and add this to the payasa. If you are vegan, toast the cashews lightly instead of frying in the ghee and add to the payasa.
How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


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