Showing posts with label Festival. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Festival. Show all posts

Nippattu | Thattai

Same story as my Kaju Katli post. I asked hubby dearest what khara/ namkeen/ spicy snack should I make for Diwali and the reply was Nippattu. Again, I had tried this earlier and it was something I couldn't brag about. Tried it again and presto! it tasted good this time. I did struggle a little initially even this time, but I got the correct advice from multiple people and managed to salvage my nippattu mission. I was not rolling them thin enough and hence they were not cooking properly in the center giving them soft centers and crispy sides. After about 7-10 turning out soft, I took the advice and patted them out evenly and thinner and they turned out nice and crisp. The recipe made close to 40 nippattus.




Nippattu | Thattai


Spicy flat South Indian crisps made from Rice flour

Recipe Type:  Snacks
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     30 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Yield:              40

Ingredients:

2 cups Rice flour
1 cup Maida / Flour
1-2 tsp Red chilli powder
50 gms or 3 Tbsp Butter
2 Tbsp Oil (hot)
2-3 sprigs Curry leaves
2 Tbsp Coriander leaves (chopped)
1/2 cup Peanuts
1/4 cup Puthani / Roasted gram
1/4 tsp Asafoetida / Hing
A pinch of Cooking soda
Salt
Water
Oil for deep frying

Method:

  • Dry roast the peanuts and peel them. Crush the peanuts into 2-3 pieces, just be careful not to powder it.
  • Mix the rice flour, maida, red chilli powder, butter, chopped curry leaves, coriander leaves, peanuts, roasted gram, hing, cooking soda and salt.
  • Heat 2 tbsp of oil and add to the mix.
  • Add water and knead into a smooth dough.
  • Cover and keep aside for 10-15 mins
  • Take a small ball of dough and place it on a butter paper or any other greased surface and pat it down into a disk using your fingers. The disk should be around 2mm in thickness. Make sure it is evenly thick.
  • Heat the oil in a kadhai for deep frying. After the oil is hot, reduce the stove to medium flame.
  • Deep fry the nippattu on medium flame until they are brown on both sides.
  • Allow it to cool a little to check if they have crisped up.
  • Allow it to cool and then store in an air tight container.

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Kaju Katli | Cashew Barfi

I asked hubby dearest what he wanted for Diwali and pat came the reply "Kaju katli"... I had given it a try last Diwali and although it tasted wonderful, it never set :( So this year with renewed enthusiasm, I decided to try it again... It ended up being perfect this year and I believe all of us have put on a few pounds thanks to the perfect homemade kaju katlis. The below recipe made around 20-25.




Kaju Katli | Cashew Barfi


Fudge made with cashewnuts

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     45 minutes
Yield:              20-25

Ingredients:

1 cup Cashew
1/2 cup Sugar (heaped)
1/4 cup Water
2 Tbsp Milk
Ghee for greasing / Butter paper

Method:

  • Powder the cashew into a fine powder.
  • Add sugar and water to a kadhai (Preferably non-stick), and allow it to come to a boil while stirring.
  • Keep the stove on medium/low flame and keep stirring frequently.
  • The test to check if the sugar syrup has reached the desired consistency is simple, keep a small bowl of water at room temperature next to you. Spill a drop of the sugar syrup into this bowl, if it dissolves immediately, the sugar syrup still needs to thicken. If it forms a thread that does not dissolve even when touched, the sugar syrup has reached the desired consistency.
  • Now add the cashew powder and keep stirring until the dough becomes one mass.
  • The check if the dough has reached the desired consistency, wet your finger and take a small piece of dough and roll it between your finger, if it forms a non sticky ball, the dough is done.
  • Remove from heat and move into a different bowl or plate.
  • While the dough is still warm, start kneading it. If it feels too dry, add the milk and knead until the cashew leaves oil.
  • Grease a plate and place the dough on it or place the dough on a piece of butter paper.
  • Roll out the dough to desired thickness (appx. 4-5mm).
  • Cut into diamond shape using a sharp knife.
  • Allow it to cool for 1-2 hours before separating the barfis.
  • Store in a cool dry place. Refrigerate after 2 days as it contains milk.



Note/ Tips:

1) In case you overgrind the cashew, it will form small lumps. Do not fret, these will be smoothed out in the end while kneading.
2) I used half cashews, and when I ground them, I still had 1 cup of cashew powder. If we use full cashews, we may get more or less than 1 cup of powder. We need 1 cup of cashew powder.
3) After removing it from the stove, the dough is very hot, use gloves while kneading
4) In case the dough looks brittle and forms hard lumps after removing from heat, allow it to cool a little, and then pulse it in the mixer until all lumps are broken and you get a fine powder. Knead this powder along with milk to get a smooth dough.
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Khova Peda

A free Saturday morning got me in experimental mood. I'm generally stay away from making sweets unless it's a special occasion or a festival, but this Saturday I was in the mood for something sweet. And without any recipe in hand, I decided to make khova pedas. Luckily for me, they turned out great.

Khova peda


Khova

Khova peda



Khova Peda


Cardamom flavored milk fudge

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          North Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     90 minutes
Yield:              20-25

Ingredients:

1 litre full fat Milk or 3/4 cup Khova
5-6 tbsp Powdered sugar
2-3 Cardamom
5-6 Almonds(Optional)

Method:
  • I made fresh khova, 1 litre of milk gave me 3/4 cup of khova. You can use store bought khova too.
  • Add 1 L of full fat milk into a non-stick pan.
  • Allow the milk to come to a boil and then lower the flame to low.
  • Keep stirring occasionally. I stirred once every 5 mins.
  • Once most of the milk has evaporated and you can see mostly milk solids, keep a close watch on the pan, you don't want to burn the whole thing. Stirring may be frequently needed.
  • Powder the cardamom and add to pan. Mix well.
  • Add the sugar by the spoonful until you get the desired sweetness. I added 5.5 tbsp. of powdered sugar.
  • Keep stirring and cooking until the whole mixture is one mass and sticks together.
  • Remove from the stove and cool for 10-15 mins, until you can shape them into pedas
  • Roll the dough into small balls and flatten them
  • Garnish with slivers of almond
  • Allow it to cool and then serve
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Kadle Bele Payasa | Chana Dal Payasam


Guysss !!! "100" H-U-N-D-R-E-D... This is my 100th post on OneTeaspoonOfLife...

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

My first milestone in my blogging journey. Ever since I reached the nervous 90's, I started thinking about what my 100th post should be. I asked for suggestions from family, but I was more confused than ever. I wanted it to be something sweet, something influenced by my roots and most of all, something I love.

Kadle Bele Payasa has been a favourite since childhood. And to top it, this was a part of the naivedyam (offering) to Lord Ganesha for Ganesh Chaturthi. I made it long back, but held on, on posting it, so I could make it my 100th. So blessed by Lord Ganesha, comes my 100th recipe on this blog for the simple, delicate and delicious Kadle Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam.

Kadle Bele Payasa is a South Indian Kheer or pudding made using Chana Dal (Split Bengal Gram) and Rice. The dal and rice are cooked in coconut milk along with cardamom and jaggery.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

The base of this payasa or kheer is the Chana Dal. The dal needs to be soaked for at least 2-3 hours to make cooking it easier. I pressure cooked it, but you can easily cook it in a deep saucepan. Usually, dal is cooked until it disintegrates and is mushy, but not in this case. The dal should be just cooked. It should still retain its shape and should still have a slight bite to it.

The other major ingredient here is the rice. And just like the chana dal, it needs to be just cooked. The rice grains should not be mushy. They should still have a bite to them.

Coconut is the soul of South India and also of this Kadle Bele Payasa. The Kadle Bele Payasa gets its creaminess from coconut. You can add coconut milk or finely ground coconut flesh. I sometimes add coconut milk and sometimes the ground coconut. The difference is not in taste, but in texture. Coconut milk gives it smooth creaminess while the ground coconut gives the payasa a coarse texture.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Jaggery is unrefined cane sugar. If you don't have access to jaggery, you can add palm sugar or brown sugar or any unrefined sugar. If you are using jaggery, I suggest using the darkest variety you get. Dark jaggery has the least amount of additives it in and has a richer taste.
No Indian sweet is complete without ground Cardamom. Just the fragrance of cardamom reminds me of dessert.

Dry fruits are totally optional for this Kadle Bele Payasa, but I don't know any dish where the addition of dry fruits has ruined it. Add them just chopped or fry them in ghee like I did. If you are vegan or want to make a vegan dessert, skip the ghee and just lightly toast the dry fruits. I added cashew nuts and raisins, you can add almonds as well.

If you are making this for Naivedyam or as an offering to god, refrain from tasting it. Follow the recipe and you should be good. Hold off on the jaggery if you are concerned it being too sweet while offering it in Naivedyam. You can heat a little water and dissolve jaggery in it and mix it to the payasa while eating.

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

If you liked this, you may also like:
  • Modak - Modaks are traditional steamed Indian dumpling made from rice flour, coconut and jaggery. Served as an offering to Lord Ganesha in West and South India. 
  • Coconut Laddoo - Instant Fudge balls made with coconut and condensed milk.
  • Mavinahannu Seekarne - Maavina Hannu Seekarne or Aamras is a simple traditional dessert made with mango pulp and milk and flavored with cardamom.



Kadle bele payasa | Chana dal payasam

How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com
Kadle Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam is a South Indian kheer or pudding made with rice, lentils and fresh coconut.

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     2 Hours (Includes lentil soaking time)
Cook time:     60 minutes
Yield:              2-3 Servings

Ingredients:


0.5 cup Kadle bele / Chana dal
2-3 Tbsp Cooked rice
0.5 cup desiccated fresh Coconut or 1 cup Coconut Milk
0.5 cup Jaggery (grated or shaved)
1 tsp or 4 pods of Cardamom
8-10 Cashew nuts(Split) (Optional)
8-10 Kismis / Raisins(Optional)
1 Tbsp Ghee (Optional)
Water as required

Method:


Soak the kadle bele for 2-3 hours.
Pressure cook it with water until done. It should be cooked but not mushy. I cooked it in 2 cups of water for around 10 mins/ 2-3 whistles.
Pour the kadle bele along with 1 cup of the water it was cooked in, into a kadhai. Keep the flame low.
Add the cooked rice to it.
If using coconut milk, just pour it to the kadhai with the kadle bele and rice. If using fresh cococut, grind it with water until it is is fine and then add this to the kadhai.
Add the grated jaggery and cardamom and cook for 5-10 mins until the jaggery melts and mixes evenly. I suggest adding it by the spoonful until the sweetness is right for you. Add water as required. The consistency is usually on the thicker side.
In another small pan, heat the ghee and lightly fry the cashew nuts and raisins until the cashews are light brown and add this to the payasa. If you are vegan, toast the cashews lightly instead of frying in the ghee and add to the payasa.
How to make Kadale Bele Payasa or Chana Dal Payasam at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


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Lemon rice | Chitranna


how to make chitranna, lemon rice recipe at One Teaspoon Of Life


Again, this is a mandate on your banana leaf for festivals and functions. It is served on the bottom left side of your banana leaf or plate right next to the plain rice. If you are eating this for breakfast, you can make many different versions. You can add vegetables like onion, capsicum, carrots, potato or peas. You can add avarekalu or lima beans. You can add raw mango. But again, at the end of the day if this is for festival, the simplest version is served with just peanuts. This is the recipe that follows…

how to make chitranna, lemon rice recipe at One Teaspoon Of Life



Lemon rice | Chitranna

how to make chitranna, lemon rice recipe at One Teaspoon Of Life
Lemon Rice or Chitranna (Kannada) is a South Indian dish in which rice (usually leftover) is flavored with lemon and turmeric. Peanuts can be added for additional texture.

Recipe Type:  Main Course
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     10 minutes
Cook time:     15 minutes
Yield:              2 cups

Ingredients:


2 cups Cooked Rice
2-3 Green Chillies
6-8 Curry leaves
2 Tbsp Peanuts
A handful of Coriander leaves (Optional)
1 Tbsp desiccated fresh Coconut(Optional)
1 tsp Mustard seeds
3 tsp Oil
1 tsp Turmeric powder
1 Lemon
Salt

Method:


Heat oil in a kadhai and add the mustard seeds to it
After they splutter, add the peanuts and fry until the peanuts are slightly brown.
Add the slit green chillies and curry leaves.
Add the turmeric powder and lime juice
Add the rice and salt and mix well until the rice is coated with the turmeric powder
Cook for 1-2 mins while stirring
Garnish with desiccated coconut and chopped coriander leaves



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Sautekayi Kosambri | Cucumber Koshambari

Kosambri is a south Indian salad that is a must for any festival or function in Karnataka. I think our ancestors intended for us to eat healthy by mandating a salad amidst all that festival fanfare. It is usually The recipe posted below is of the version I have grown up eating . It was my favorite in the entire habbada oota (festival food) and if there were any leftovers, the whole family knew who could be counted on to finish it :D.  These days you get various types of kosambri. There is one with grated carrot that tastes nice and the latest I have seen is with American sweet corn. It is either made with split moong dal or split chana dal. Personally I have always preferred moong dal. So the recipe below is for cucumber and moong dal kosambri....








Sautekayi Kosambri | Cucumber Koshambari


A traditional South Indian salad consisting of lentils and cucumber

Recipe Type:  Salad
Cuisine:          South Indian
Prep Time:     2 Hours (includes lentil soaking time)
Cook time:     10 minutes
Yield:              3-4 servings

Ingredients:

½ cup Moong dal
1 Cucumber
1-2 Green Chillies
A handful Coriander
1 Tbsp desiccated fresh Coconut
2 tsp Oil
1 tsp Mustard seeds
5-6 Curry leaves
1 Tbsp Lime juice
Salt

Method:

  • Soak the moong dal in water for about 2-3 hours
  • Drain the water and keep the moong dal aside
  • Chop the cucumber finely and add to the moong dal
  • Add lime juice and salt as per taste
  • Heat oil in a small pan and add mustard seeds to it
  • After the mustard seeds splutter, add curry leaves and slit green chillies and pour this tempering on the kosambri
  • Add the desiccated coconut and finely chopped coriander leaves and mix well
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Steamed Modaks | Ukadiche Modak | Sihi Kadabu


How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Lord Ganesha's birthday aka Ganesh Chaturthi is celebrated with fervor and grandeur in Goa. People take a nice vacation from their hectic lives and move into their ancestral houses for a week usually. The entire family gets together to welcome Ganesha into their house and hearts. You can see colorful idols of Ganesha everywhere you turn. His throne is decorated with flowers and banana leaf. Everyone is dressed in their festive best.

And when everything is at its best, so is the Food. In India, every festival revolves around Food. Ganesh Chaturthi is no exception. While one may not make as many variety of sweets and snacks as one does for Diwali, there are a few that are made especially for beloved Ganesha only.

How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

Modaks are considered to be Lord Ganesha's favorite sweet and a must on Ganesh Chaturthi.
Modaks are made in myriad different ways. Some deep fry it while some steam it. Sometimes the filling is of fresh coconut and jaggery, while sometimes it is dry coconut and sugar. I have also seen a recipe where it is filled with chocolate. Sometimes all this is skipped and modaks are just modak shaped pedas.

In our culture, we do not deep fry modaks. My grand mother was totally against deep frying anything on Ganesh chaturthi so we always made the steamed version stuffed with fresh coconut and jaggery. And this is the version I absolutely LOVE.
Steamed Modaks or Ukadiche Modak or Sihi Kadabu have the outer layer made of a rice flour dough and a stuffing of fresh coconut, jaggery (unrefined sugar) and cardamom powder.

To make the outer layer of rice flour, the rice flour is added to boiling water and mixed until it forms a stiff dough. Getting the consistency of the dough right is probably the toughest part of making the Modak. If the dough isn't made properly, there are chances that the modaks will split while steaming, which, believe me isn't really as disastrous as it sounds. They still taste great and means just some more modaks for the Cook. Hurray!!

How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

The filling is made by cooking together grated fresh coconut and jaggery. In this recipe, the jaggery cannot be replaced with refined sugar, as it just will not live up to the taste and texture of the modak. The mixture is cooked until it the water almost evaporates. Cooking it beyond that will cause the jaggery to crystallize and the filling will become one big hard lump.

These days there are moulds available to shape the modaks after filling them. Unfortunately, as you can see in the pictures, I wasn't aware of it until I'd finished making them, hence very amateurish looking modaks in my house this year. But who is worried about the looks when they tasted SO delicious.

If you are making this for Naivedyam for Lord Ganesha, please do not taste anything and follow the recipe and your instincts and it will turn out great.

How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com

If you liked this, you may also like:
  • Khova Peda - Simple peda made from milk solids and sugar.
  • Kaju Katli - Fudge or Barfi made from cashewnuts and sugar. A favorite in every household.
  • Coconut Laddoo - A simple laddoo made from coconut powder and condensed milk in under 1 hour.
  • Kadle Bele Payasa - Kheer made with rice, chana dal and coconut
How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.com


Steamed Modaks | Kadabu | Sweet Dumplings


How to make Ukadiche Modak Recipe at www.oneteaspoonoflife.comModaks are traditional steamed Indian dumpling made from rice flour, coconut and jaggery. Served as an offering to Lord Ganesha in West and South India. 

Recipe Type:  Dessert
Cuisine:          Indian
Prep Time:     30 minutes
Cook time:     60 minutes
Yield:              9

Ingredients:


0.75 cup Coconut
0.5 cup Jaggery
1 tsp Cardamom
0.75 cup Rice flour
1.5 cups Water
1 tsp Ghee or Oil
0.25 tsp Salt

Method:


In a kadhai, mix the coconut and jaggery and cook on low flame. Keep stirring the mixture to avoid burning. Cook until the mixture is almost dry. Do not overcook as then the jaggery will harden. Add the cardamom powder and keep aside to cool.
In another pan, bring 1 cup of water to a  rolling boil. Add the salt and the ghee and remove it from the heat.
Add rice flour by the spoonful and keep stirring to avoid forming lumps.
Add more water if needed. The dough should be slightly stiff yet malleable.
Keep the pan back on the stove and keep the flame low.
Keep stirring until the whole dough becomes one mass. It will start sticking to the spoon/ spatula. It took me around 5 mins. Take a small marble sized piece of dough and press it using  your thumb and index finger, it should not break into pieces. Nor should it stick to your hand. If the consistency or the texture is not correct, the modaks may split while cooking. If it is your first time, do not fret over a few split ones.
Allow this to cool for some time.
While it is still warm, take a small ball of flour and flatten it. Place a small ball of the filling inside it and use your hands and stretch the flour to cover the filling.
Shape the modaks accordingly.
Steam the modaks in a steamer for around 8-10 mins. I used an idli steamer, you can use a cooker without the whistle.
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